With a collection of workshop tools--whether for construction jobs or for around the DIY house projects--it’s top priority to make sure all of your tools are in the best shape and are taken care of. Tools don’t come at a cheap price, so proper care is essential in order for them to last for a long time. Unfortunately, after much usage, wear, tear, and rusting of tools tend to happen. Luckily, at Bora Tools, we sell a vast variety of workshop accessories that are specific to cleaning and restoring needs. From waxes, polishes, rust removers, to covers, racks, and more, we have an abundance of products that are designed to keep your high-quality, expensive tools in prime condition all year round.
Relax and enjoy your outdoor space with this smart patio combo consisting of a sofa and chair. You can adjust the size completely to make it fit perfectly onto your patio or deck, and both the sofa and chair have arms that double as trays for al fresco dining. And you can make your own cushions to fit, or use shop-bought ones and add your own ties, if necessary.

Let’s start with perhaps the most basic tool in every household – the claw hammer. The claw on one side of the head should be well counterbalanced by the finished head, which should be somewhat rounded. The other kind of head is the waffle-head. Most commonly used in construction, it leaves a distinctive waffle mark on the wood when you drive the nail. This, of course, is not the proper nail for woodworking.
What makes this JCB Teleskid machine unique is it’s one-of-a-kind telescoping boom, which gives it the ability to reach a variety of places. The Teleskid’s telescoping boom gives you eight feet of outward reach. Plus, its one armed design gives you 60 percent more visibility than similar twin-armed machines. With a fully extended boom the Teleskid can lift up to 1600 pounds. With the boom retracted that weight capacity goes up to an impressive 3695 pounds. To find out more about the Teleskid from JCB, click here.
I’ve been doing a lot of remodeling on my house and this wristband has come in pretty handy. The magnets work very well and able to hold all the screws, washers, and bolts for the different projects I’m working on. The pockets are a great addition too for holding plastic items. In fact, I found it useful for holding a small pencil where I can have quick access to for marking measurements for cuts. Overall it’s a great quality wristband and would definitely recommend.

Drill pocket holes from the outer boards to the inner board. Drilling the holes before adding screws prevents the boards from cracking. To create the holes, measure along the sides of the center board. Mark it about every 7 in (18 cm). You will need to use a very long drill bit, about 3 in (7.6 cm) wide, called a pocket hole drill bit. Drill at an angle down through the side boards and into the side of the center board every 7 in (18 cm).[4]


If you like fun, customized tabletops, DIY is the way to go.  Why settle for the same plain, boring table everybody has in their dining room when you can make it the centerpiece of your home?  Maybe you’ve got old furniture that could use a facelift, or you need to update a table that was broken.  In all of these cases, there are so many options available to create a one-of-a-kind tabletop you’ll love.  Whether that includes learning how to laminate wood pieces together, stenciling, painting, staining or transferring images, or using more unique materials like fabric or epoxy, there is a DIY tabletop idea here for you!
Rachel Teodoro and Holy-Craft.com, 2010-present. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used and up to one photo can posted, provided that full and clear credit is given to Rachel Teodoro and Holy Craft with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

With a pencil and a protractor, divide the larger disc into 30-degree wedges to create 12 center lines for the bottle indents. Center and trace the smaller disc on top of the larger disc. Next, with a drill press, drill 3/8-in.-deep holes on the 12 center lines with the 1-7/8-in. Forstner bit, spacing them between the disc’s outer edge and the traced circle. Next, divide the smaller disc into 60-degree wedges and drill six more 3/8-in.-deep holes with the Forstner bit.
Aside from the privacy it offers, a latticework porch trellis is a perfect way to add major curb appeal to your home for $100 or less. The trellis shown here is made of cedar, but any decay-resistant wood like redwood, cypress or treated pine would also be a good option. Constructed with lap joints for a flat surface and an oval cutout for elegance, it’s a far upgrade from traditional premade garden lattice. As long as you have experience working a router, this project’s complexity lies mostly in the time it takes to cut and assemble. Get the instructions complete with detailed illustrations here.
I've worn this apron in my studio/workshop several times now, and I really like it. It's more expensive than some, but the materials and construction are first-rate. I rarely give five stars, but the workmanship on this apron is impressive. The fabric is substantial and, although a bit stiff at present, comfortable to wear. The strap and grommet system is pretty clever, allowing a good fit for most, I would think. I'm a 5'-7" not-skinny woman, and I'm able to cross the straps at the small of my back and then tie them in front, so I'm guessing there would be plenty of strap length for bigger men. The straps sit comfortably on my shoulders. And all the pockets are great!
Your monster of a table is going to be HEAVY, so I strongly recommend moving it to its final destination in two pieces–lay a blanket down in your dining room, put the top on it upside down, then the frame upside down on top of that. Attach a couple 2×4 supports across the frame for good measure, then begin the frustrating process of centering the frame on the top. Once you have the top centered, attach your brackets–I did two on each end and three on each side.
The Milwaukee REDSTICK can be used to screed, smooth, and level. Once you’re done, the level is preposterously easy to wipe clean. The REDSTICK also has all the great features you would expect from a Milwaukee level. SHARPSITE Vial Technology makes the magnified bubble easy to read and the REDSTICK’s magnesium core keeps the level from breaking down. The Milwaukee REDSTICK Concrete Levels are available in 24-in., 48-in. and 72-in. lengths starting at $99.99.
Now that you have the final dimensions for the table top, you need to choose which boards you want to use.  Because we don't have a table saw and we wanted to keep this project simple and not cut any boards lengthwise, we {and by we, I mean my husband} plugged and chugged different board sizes into his calculator to find the perfect equation. We ended up using seven 1x6 boards for the width and on the two end caps we used 1x8's. Remember, a 1x6 is not six inches wide, it's five and a half, and a 1x8 is seven and a quarter inches wide. When you are doing your math to figure out what boards you need, remember that the nominal size {1x4, 1x6, 1x8, etc} is not the actual measured dimension of the board.
If you don’t intend to finish the wood, you can probably safely skip this step. But for me, it was crucial to sand each board, not only to ensure a level tabletop, but also to give the stain a surface to which it could easily adhere. Of course, no matter how much sanding you do, some woods (2x4s included) are not milled for finish work and may never get totally smooth. But that was fine with me, as I figured that any imperfections that remained in the end would work to underline the rustic quality of the piece. It was in that same spirit that, in the process of sanding the boards (with fine-grit paper, always in the same direction), I opted not to sand down a few of the chatter marks left by the sawmill. I knew the stain would take to the wood a bit differently in those spots than elsewhere, lending the tabletop a further layer of charm—or so I hoped. Once I was done sanding, after thoroughly cleaning each board with a moist tack cloth, I let enough time pass for the wood to dry out completely.
Rolled-on poly looks terrible at first, but the bubbles disappear in minutes, leaving a smoother surface than most of us can achieve with a brush. Beware of ridges formed by the edges of the roller and humps where you start and stop. You can minimize both of those flaws by applying lighter coats. We experimented with several kinds of rollers and got the best results with microfiber mini rollers. We also tried rolling on water-based poly; don’t do it.
When you buy the wood, look for pieces that aren’t warped, excessively longer or shorter than the others, and, if you can get lucky, don’t carry the telltale “new wood” planer marks. We purchased the most inexpensive wood that we could find. You’ll likely find them in 2- and 4-ft pieces. If you have a saw at home, you might consider getting the 4 ft pieces to decrease the cost of your project a bit.
The engineering involved in building this garden bench is pretty simple, and we have provided some links to get a full cut list and plans with photos to help you along the way. Additionally, to the stock lumber, you will need wood screws, barrel locks, and hinges to complete the table. A miter saw or hand saw is also extremely helpful for cutting down your stock to the correct angle and length.

Woodworking plans for beginners can be a great way to learn how to make cool furniture projects and home goods easily and conveniently. No matter whether you want to learn how to make diy wood projects that sell with the hope of building something cool for your kids and wife, or just for fun and personal fulfillment, buying a large archive of endless plans is your best choice.


Reclaimed Wood from Corn Crib HOW TO DESIGN AND BUILD AN ENTRY WAY COAT RACK AND BENCH There was a door in granddad’s home the client wanted to preserve and wondered, if they provided the wood, could I build an entryway coat rack and bench using the door as part of the build. The wood they wanted to provide, well, that was from the family owned Tennessee corn crib that had been torn down and they didn’t want to lose the wood or the memories. Not only was this a corncrib but it was eventually used by the great grandchildren as a play house. So for the client there are as many memories in this build as there are colors. THIS PROJECT TRULY DEFINES THE “CUSTOM” in BAYNE CUSTOM WOODWORKING. I spent some time to design a simple layout in @sketchup_official so the client could approve the idea I had in mind. The wood showed up in two deliveries so we stacked it outside because this was the first time I worked with barn wood. I did not want to introduce possible termites to my shop. So my first call was to my pest guy asking how I would treat the wood for termites. Much to my relief he said I had nothing to worry about. This was “real” wood! Not nominal at all, nominal is how we buy our wood at a local hardware store. Where a 2×4 is actually 1 ½  x 3 ½ . These 2×4’s were at least 2”x4”’s if not more and were hard, heavy and dusty, did I say heavy? After cutting to length on my handy @DewaltTough miter saw, I had to take them to my @ridgidpowertools table saw and square up the bottoms only.  I was very careful not to lose any of the original saw marks and character because that would ruin the entire purpose. For someone who likes clean, crisp edges, this was a bit of a challenge. I used @kregjig Kreg Jig® K4 Master System to join all the pieces of the base, the seat frame and the supports to join the two together. I was very careful to hide all of the pocket holes so they could not be seen from any angle. I used Titebond Products original interior wood glue to join all the pieces together. The next item was to assemble the back which included grandad’s door as the center piece. The door was only 71 ½ tall which determined the overall height of the project. Part of this back also includes two live edge pieces that we picked to use as the “L” shaped wings or side walls. The door measured 24” which left me with 6” on each side to make up the final size of 36”. So I chose two of the straightest boards that were closest to 6” and cut them to width so as not to waste any wood or lose any character. I used the Kreg Jig® K4 Master System

The most commonly purchased claw hammer is the 20 oz. size. It’s heavy enough to easily drive nails but easily manipulated when pulling nails. While wooden handles are picturesque, they may not stand up to the strain if you have to pull a lot of nails. Hammers with a steel handle, or even fiberglass, will be stronger. However, these won’t absorb the vibrations from driving nails the way a hickory handle will. You’ll also need to make sure the fiberglass and metal handles have a rubberized grip for control and comfort. If you’re going to be driving a lot of nails, the wooden handled hammer will be better for reducing stress on your hand, and wrist, too.
Working on one side at a time, glue and nail the side to the back. Apply glue and drive three 1-5/8-in. nails into each shelf, attach the other side and nail those shelves into place to secure them. Clamps are helpful to hold the unit together while you’re driving nails. Center the top piece, leaving a 2-in. overhang on both sides, and glue and nail it into place. Paint or stain the unit and then drill pilot holes into the top face of each side of the unit and screw in the hooks to hold your ironing board. Mount the shelf on drywall using screw-in wall anchors.
Whether you are just getting started or you simply want to hone your wood work skills, you can locate many online sources that can be extremely helpful. Online plan collections are gaining popularity and enthusiastic builders are keen to improve their skills in a convenient way, given the busy lifestyles we often find ourselves leading with a lack of time and ideas. Thanks to the people who have organized plans with technology and the internet, it is now possible to find a huge variety of woodworking projects online from the comfort of your shop or livingroom. Some of the finest guides on the net can help you become an expert woodworker surprisingly quickly, you just have to work at it.
After your table is pieced together, you will flip it over {remember, you've been working on it upside down} and sand it.  My husband isn't a big fan of the planks and worried about cups and plates getting stuck and spilled on the uneven parts of the boards, so he went to town with the sander. You can keep more of the plank look by sanding it less.
The owners, webmasters, administrators, authors and editors, expressly disclaim all and any liability to any person, whether a user of this website or not, in respect of anything and of the consequences of anything done or omitted to be done by any such person in reliance, whether whole or partial, upon the whole or any part of the contents of this website. Please exercise caution when working with any tools or machinery. Follow common safety rules and precautions as outlined in any manuals related to the equipment being used. If advice or other expert assistance is required, the services of a competent professional person should be sought.
By video tutorial, you will get step by step process instructions of making a nice wooden folding sling chair from scratch. However, my first wooden chair was not the best one, but it was good enough to motivate me to make some more folding chairs like this one. If I can make this, you too can make one yourself. You can browse the internet for more folding sling chairs ideas and start making one now.
Drill pocket holes from the outer boards to the inner board. Drilling the holes before adding screws prevents the boards from cracking. To create the holes, measure along the sides of the center board. Mark it about every 7 in (18 cm). You will need to use a very long drill bit, about 3 in (7.6 cm) wide, called a pocket hole drill bit. Drill at an angle down through the side boards and into the side of the center board every 7 in (18 cm).[4]
​Luckily, we have also managed to find a detailed video tutorial of the Barn door project that illustrates the process of building a Barn door of your own. The steps and instructions in the video tutorial are different from the source links listed above. Actually, you can make different types of designs for your Barn door depending on which one you can afford easily and DIY on your own.
You can’t beat spray foam for sealing around windows and doors or sealing large gaps and cracks in old house walls, foundations and attics, but how often have you run a can empty when you were so close to being finished? And how disappointing is it to use a partial can, knowing you’ll have to throw the rest away? If you’re a regular spray foam user, it might be time to step up to a foam dispensing gun.
Woodworking plans for difficult projects, will list which tools you need to use and show you the areas where you still need practice. Come back to the advanced woodworking plan later on, after you have had more practice with your woodworking tools doing basic projects which steadily build your skill level. To gain the skills for advanced woodworking, you really need to try as much variety as possible, so that you broaden your experience. Making 100 coffee tables that are all the same will not make you a skilled woodworker but making 100 different tables of all kinds and sizes, will certainly make you a skilled woodworker.

The next important hand tool for the woodworker is an accurate tape measure. Get a retractable one that is at least 25 feet long. Any longer than that, and you start having problems getting it to roll back up. Since measurements on large scale projects can be very susceptible to even the most minute measurement variations, you’ll want to make sure the “hook” or tab at the end of the is firmly attached, with no give. When they get loose, you’ll have as much as 1/8” variation in your measurements. This can add up to some severe accuracy problems in the long run.
We no longer have that problem because we picked up a set of Mag Shims from FastCap. Mag Shims are 1/8-in. magnetic spacers. If you need a blade height of 7/8 in., simply stack seven spacers, and raise the blade to match. They also work great for setting the depth on router bits and drill presses. We stick them right to the backside of the fence, so they’re always at hand and never get lost.
We call them strongbacks and we use them on every tabletop we build. It's just a scrap strip of 3/4" plywood, with 3/4" pocket holes drilled about ever few inches. The strongback is attached to the bottom of the tabletop as the glue dries. The square edge of the plywood prevents the tabletop from warping or cupping as it dries. Then we remove the strongbacks (and save them for the next tabletop) when we attach the tabletop to the base.

Nightstand table plans have everything you need to create a bedside table to keep every needy thing at reach at night time. This Nigh Stand plan is quite different in design from the most of the other plans. This stand has not only the three regular drawers but also having a hidden drawer that uses a secret locking mechanism to keep contents securely.
While the top is drying, measure the thickest portion. Add 1/16” to this measurement and mark a horizontal line with a framing square across the tops of the table legs. This line marks the gutter structure mounting depth. Legs will protrude 1/16” above the plane of the tabletop. Ask a helper to hold the leg tight to the inside corner of the gutter structure with the mark at the top of the gutter. Drive at least two wood screws through the inside face of the gutter into the sides of the leg.

A few days back, I was searching for some cool DIY plans. So, I got to work and ended up coming up with some easy to follow project and an awesome new ice chest cooler to have out on the deck! It was going to be perfect for summer hangouts and barbecues. It was a fun and practical plan to work on and I know you will have fun tackling select a design from this plan and start building your own. Enjoy learning how you can build a rustic cooler also sing the video tutorial and source tutorial plan!
×