Leave your tabletop longer than necessary until the sanding is done, then cut to final length. Most tabletops are too wide to trim on a tablesaw, even with a crosscut sled, and this is where I use a hand-held circular saw. Clamp a guide strip so it’s square to one edge, then follow it with your saw. Repeat the process on the other end, then carefully use your hand-held belt sander to remove any blade marks on edges. It sounds like a coarse process, but you can get great results this way.
Limited floor space is a problem in most shops. However, that’s no longer an excuse for kicking up a bunch of dust without a dust collection system as Grizzly now makes a wall-mounted dust collector. It’s equipped with a powerful 1-HP motor prewired for 120V. It features a canister filter with six times the surface area of a standard bag-filter, yet it takes up less space. The filter is easy to keep clean with the hand crank filter-cleaning brush.
The reclaimed wood boards are glued together, side-by-side, to form the table top. Use a biscuit joiner to cut matching slots along the board edges (Image 1). Because this tool can be set to cut the all of grooves at the same precise depth, when you insert the biscuits in the slots and pull the boards together the result is a smooth, level surface (Image 2).

Thermal imaging systems work great at finding water leaks, electrical hot spots, and insulation gaps in walls. But until recently, thermal imaging systems were not a practical tool for the average contractor because they cost thousands of dollars and were the size of a microwave oven. But now this extremely helpful technology is accessible. FLIR’s new C2 compact imager is pocket-size but has most of the same important features as larger models. The touch screen controls are intuitive to use, and it acts as a regular camera as well, which helps when pointing out to homeowners or coworkers where exactly the trouble spots are. They also make models that work with your smartphone.


Building a table is one of the most deceptively simple woodworking projects going. What could be easier than gluing up a few boards and applying a finish, right? But reality is often surprising, because building a top for that table can go wrong in ways you might not realize until it’s too late.  Here are my favourite tabletop construction tips, plus advice on how to avoid trouble.
Ridgid has a new C-style close-quarter tubing cutter that slices through both 1/2-in. and 3/4-in. tubing, which means one less tool to carry and fumble around for. The cutting wheel is spring loaded so it needs no adjustment as you spin the cutter, and the outside surface has screwdriver slots for getting leverage in tight spaces. The 1/2 – 3/4 Rigid tubing cutter costs $32 and is available at plumbing supply stores and online retailers.

One of the best stud finders you’ll ever use is the Franklin Sensors ProSensor 710. It’s unique in that there’s a whole bar of red lights that light up whenever it detects a stud. Unlike other sensors, which have a single light that stays on as it passes over the wood, the lights on the 710 tell you exactly where the wood stops and starts. No guesswork. Push a button, drag it over the wall and those hidden mysteries reveal themselves. You won’t even need to read the directions!


For an artisanal look, you can use woodworking hand tools. These are easy to use, lightweight and require no batteries or power cords to operate. Many hand tools are covered by multi-year or even lifetime warranties for extra protection and value. Set up your pieces with the most expertly crafted woodworking hardware, such as hinges, pulls and knobs to create a final product that you can give as a gift, sell or just display proudly.
With the stain dry, I began to build the tabletop. Others might have chosen to build first and stain second. But I felt that, given the combination of colors being used, I was most likely to achieve satisfying results—or less likely to mess up—if I stained the boards before I joined them together. The picture above shows the unfinished undersides of the boards after I had almost finished fastening each one to its neighbors. First, I marked off where the pocket holes would be located. For each regular board, I planned to put in at least two pocket holes. I needed to put additional holes in the boards at the two long edges, because those boards would need to be secured not only to those in the adjoining row, but also to each other. Finally, after creating the pocket holes, I assembled the tabletop one row at a time, driving in the screws that magically brought the disparate pieces together into a cohesive surface.
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Fill all holes with wood filler and let dry. Apply additional coats of wood filler as needed. When wood filler is completely dry, sand the project in the direction of the wood grain with 120 grit sandpaper. Vacuum sanded project to remove sanding residue. Remove all sanding residue on work surfaces as well. Wipe project clean with damp cloth. It is always recommended to apply a test coat on a hidden area or scrap piece to ensure color evenness and adhesion. Use primer or wood conditioner as needed.


Probably the next most useful shop accessory is a large work table. I like to use a portable table that can be moved around the shop as needed. This particular table, which you can build by clicking on the link above, is lightweight yet sturdy and has retractable casters. When you want to move the table, simply lift each end and the casters lock into place to allow the table to roll. Once you get it into position, pull the cord on each end and the casters retract, so the table won't move.
Leave your tabletop longer than necessary until the sanding is done, then cut to final length. Most tabletops are too wide to trim on a tablesaw, even with a crosscut sled, and this is where I use a hand-held circular saw. Clamp a guide strip so it’s square to one edge, then follow it with your saw. Repeat the process on the other end, then carefully use your hand-held belt sander to remove any blade marks on edges. It sounds like a coarse process, but you can get great results this way.
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Up to now, I had been completely focused on the upward-facing portion of the tabletop, the side that would be most visible. But as I drew nearer to the finish line, I started to doubt my earlier decision not to finish the bottom side too. So I went back and did the extra work, and though this additional step might have been unnecessary, I like to think it helped make the table fit better into its home for the summer, my front porch. All that was left now was to attach the top to the metal table. As easy as it was to finish the tabletop with Minwax, it was no mean feat to devise a way of securing the top to the base. Ultimately, the answer to my problem came in an unlikely form. On a typical day, electrical cable hardware would never have entered my mind, but as the result of a funny twist of fate—the same sort of coincidence that led me to undertake this project in the first place—these simple snap-and-click fasteners enabled me to attach the top to the base and call it day. Now, with this project under my belt, I’m starting to eye those 2x6s still lingering in my scrap pile!
Adirondack Chairs in Tennessee Cedar Wood Growing up in Central New York and spending years in the Adirondack Mountains, I grew up seeing all types of Adirondack chairs. But it was not until I moved to middle Tennessee that I attempted to build Adirondack chairs myself. I found plans that gave me the basic design to build the adult chairs. I made some adjustments in order to fit them into my style and the type of wood that I have available. I found a cedar mill within an hour of my shop that allows me to purchase rough cut lumber. Because of the nature of rough lumber I am buying wood that is actually thicker, wider and longer than wood purchased at a brick front store.  Where a nominal 2”x 4”x 96” bought at a local lumber store is actually 1.5 x 3.5 x 96. The cedar I purchase is 2 ¼ x 4 ¼ x 102 inches. Once run through the surface planer to clean up the roughness and sanded, I am able to build with actual 2” x 4” or 2” x 6” lumber. This makes the chairs heavier, sturdier and more durable. Because of the size of the wood I assemble the legs and main supports with 3/8” carriage bolts. The arms, seat boards and backs are all assembled with 2” to 3” exterior screws. I predrill all the holes prior to inserting any screws. I do this because cedar, or any wood for that matter, can split at any time. The actual finished chair stands 38” tall x 39” long and 33” wide. They weigh about 35 lbs. and can seat a large adult very well but also comfortable for my tiny framed wife. The rise of the seat from the knees to the ground for your feet is 13 ½ inches. The seat reclines backward naturally but not so much that it is hard to stand from a seated position. The back is curved to support the natural curve of your back allowing for a more comfortable fit. The back is 32” tall to support even a taller person. The arms have been described as looking like whales so they are narrow where they fasten to the back of the chair and wide in the front for a cup, a book or even a laptop if you choose to work outside. *DISCLOSURE: Some of the links below are affiliate links. If you chose to click through and make a purchase I will earn a commission but there is no additional cost to you. It helps compensates the business for the time spent creating these posts. THANK YOU! Child’s Chair: The smaller child chairs are added to match the adult chairs to finish the family. These also are made with rough cedar milled and sanded to size to make the chairs sturdy. As with the adult chairs the wood will be thicker, wider and stronger than nominal wood. I use all true 1” lumber for the
Whether you are just getting started or you simply want to hone your wood work skills, you can locate many online sources that can be extremely helpful. Online plan collections are gaining popularity and enthusiastic builders are keen to improve their skills in a convenient way, given the busy lifestyles we often find ourselves leading with a lack of time and ideas. Thanks to the people who have organized plans with technology and the internet, it is now possible to find a huge variety of woodworking projects online from the comfort of your shop or livingroom. Some of the finest guides on the net can help you become an expert woodworker surprisingly quickly, you just have to work at it.
We recently upgraded a wheelbarrow with Simply Dump It pivoting handles. They slid right over the handles and took about five minutes to install. If you’re tall, you probably hunch over when you roll your wheelbarrow around the yard so you don’t end up nose-diving the wheel guard/brace into the ground, resulting in messy spills and the occasional expletive. The Simply Dump It handles raise the grip location a few inches, which lowers the handles, which in turn raises the front wheel brace. The handles not only prevent sudden stopping syndrome but also make the wheelbarrow easier to control, especially on rough terrain. And the pivoting action all but eliminates the awkward torque on your wrists when you empty the wheelbarrow. You can get Simply Dump It handles online.
This is another very interesting project. To make a similar table you need to have textured spray paint, matte black spray paint, lumber, wood boards, wheels, stain, sand paper, corner pieces, nails, bolts, nuts, washers, clamps and L brackets. First make the measurements and spray paint all the hardware including the wheels. Then make the basic box and sue nails to hold the wood pieces in place. Then use L brackets to keep them sturdy and add the bolts. Tighten the nuts into the bolts and attach the wheels.Then add the corner pieces sing nails{found on theblissfulbeeblog}.

The deep grain lines in woods like oak or walnut will telegraph through the clear finish, no matter how many coats you apply. And that’s fine; it’s part of the character of coarse-grain woods. But if a perfectly smooth surface is the look you want, use a grain filler. You’ll find several products online or at woodworking stores. With most, you wipe on the filler, squeegee off the excess with a plastic putty knife and then sand after it’s dry for a smooth-as-glass surface.

While the top is drying, measure the thickest portion. Add 1/16” to this measurement and mark a horizontal line with a framing square across the tops of the table legs. This line marks the gutter structure mounting depth. Legs will protrude 1/16” above the plane of the tabletop. Ask a helper to hold the leg tight to the inside corner of the gutter structure with the mark at the top of the gutter. Drive at least two wood screws through the inside face of the gutter into the sides of the leg.


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Adirondack Chairs in Tennessee Cedar Wood Growing up in Central New York and spending years in the Adirondack Mountains, I grew up seeing all types of Adirondack chairs. But it was not until I moved to middle Tennessee that I attempted to build Adirondack chairs myself. I found plans that gave me the basic design to build the adult chairs. I made some adjustments in order to fit them into my style and the type of wood that I have available. I found a cedar mill within an hour of my shop that allows me to purchase rough cut lumber. Because of the nature of rough lumber I am buying wood that is actually thicker, wider and longer than wood purchased at a brick front store.  Where a nominal 2”x 4”x 96” bought at a local lumber store is actually 1.5 x 3.5 x 96. The cedar I purchase is 2 ¼ x 4 ¼ x 102 inches. Once run through the surface planer to clean up the roughness and sanded, I am able to build with actual 2” x 4” or 2” x 6” lumber. This makes the chairs heavier, sturdier and more durable. Because of the size of the wood I assemble the legs and main supports with 3/8” carriage bolts. The arms, seat boards and backs are all assembled with 2” to 3” exterior screws. I predrill all the holes prior to inserting any screws. I do this because cedar, or any wood for that matter, can split at any time. The actual finished chair stands 38” tall x 39” long and 33” wide. They weigh about 35 lbs. and can seat a large adult very well but also comfortable for my tiny framed wife. The rise of the seat from the knees to the ground for your feet is 13 ½ inches. The seat reclines backward naturally but not so much that it is hard to stand from a seated position. The back is curved to support the natural curve of your back allowing for a more comfortable fit. The back is 32” tall to support even a taller person. The arms have been described as looking like whales so they are narrow where they fasten to the back of the chair and wide in the front for a cup, a book or even a laptop if you choose to work outside. *DISCLOSURE: Some of the links below are affiliate links. If you chose to click through and make a purchase I will earn a commission but there is no additional cost to you. It helps compensates the business for the time spent creating these posts. THANK YOU! Child’s Chair: The smaller child chairs are added to match the adult chairs to finish the family. These also are made with rough cedar milled and sanded to size to make the chairs sturdy. As with the adult chairs the wood will be thicker, wider and stronger than nominal wood. I use all true 1” lumber for the
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