The Stanley 32050 FatMax Power Claw is a clever power strip built into a clamp. It can grab on to a stud, rafter, sawhorse or ladder. Hang it wherever you need power. This strip works great at keeping extension cord connections off the ground. That’s convenient, but it makes even more sense if you’re working outside on a wet surface. The Power Claw has three grounded outlets and a 15-amp breaker.

Set biscuit joiner depth to #20. Lay the four best planks out on a flat surface and arrange them in final position. With a pencil and working across two boards at a time, make a mark at every 8-inch point along the seam of two boards. After marks are made, use the joiner to cut the biscuit slots at each location. Align the reference mark on the tool (similar to circular saw) and hold the top plate firmly flat against the board. In one smooth motion, plunge the tool until it hits the stop. Note: Do not cut joints on outside edges of first and last board.
Probably the handiest shop accessory in this list would be the woodworker's bench, complete with a vise. The bench is a stable-based table with a thick, hardwood top. In the top are a series of holes that are designed to accommodate bench dogs, which are little more than pegs that can be moved from hole to hole as necessary. The end of the bench has the aforementioned vise that works in concert with the bench dogs to hold pieces steady for the woodworker.

Simply brilliant. Why didn’t I think of this? So we have a nearly 100 year old house. There is always something that needs repair. Thanks to whoever invented this little guy! No more mouth full of nails or screws. No more climbing up and down the ladder to get the damn screwdriver I dropped. Probably won’t hold your 16 oz claw hammer but other than that it is perfect. I love this. Highly recommend. Thanks for reading
Clean wooden gutters of any loose debris and cut to a manageable length. Miter down to form an approximately 40" x 94" rectangle. Coat the corners with wood glue and fasten together with 15-gauge finish nails. If miters are tight 45-degree cuts, box should be square. Double check diagonal measurements before fastening completely. The two diagonal measurements should be as close to equal as possible.
Relax and enjoy your outdoor space with this smart patio combo consisting of a sofa and chair. You can adjust the size completely to make it fit perfectly onto your patio or deck, and both the sofa and chair have arms that double as trays for al fresco dining. And you can make your own cushions to fit, or use shop-bought ones and add your own ties, if necessary.
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Begin by cutting off a 10-in. length of the board and setting it aside. Rip the remaining 38-in. board to 6 in. wide and cut five evenly spaced saw kerfs 5/8 in. deep along one face. Crosscut the slotted board into four 9-in. pieces and glue them into a block, being careful not to slop glue into the saw kerfs (you can clean them out with a knife before the glue dries). Saw a 15-degree angle on one end and screw the plywood piece under the angled end of the block.
A trusty pair of Electrician Scissors is the most used tool of many of the low-voltage electricians that we’ve talked to, and Klein seems to be the go-to brand. If you’ve never heard of electrician scissors, here is a primer: Of course like any scissors, Klein’s new Electrician Scissors can cut through stuff with the blades, but they also have a cable cutting notch so you can rip through wire up to 14 AWG. They’ll strip 19 and 23 AWG wire all day long and have a notch in the tip for de-burring electrical boxes. There’s also a scraper on both blades for convenient wire cleaning. Klein’s All-Purpose Electrician’s Scissors are available online and in home centers for $24.35.
Carefully lay the top down and attach pipe clamps at roughly 1' intervals. Slowly tighten each pipe clamp in a consistent fashion until the gaps disappear. Small amounts of glue can be removed when dry; scrape up any puddled glue with a plastic putty knife. To minimize sanding later, avoid working glue into the top of the wood. Let the top set overnight.
Even a small tabletop presents a challenge if the boards you glued together  have stepped-shaped misalignments where they meet because of warping. Yes, you can sand these off, but the more topographical sanding you need to do, the less flat and regular your finished tabletop will be. The flatter and better aligned your boards are when they’re in the clamps, the happier you’ll be later. This is where end clamps and gluing cauls can help.
The Story of the Farmhouse Table with a Race Track While working my day job one of my managers came to my desk and said “I need your help”. Come to find out she ordered a farmhouse table and bench on Etsy. However the person she ordered it from fell off the face of the earth and left her without a table or her money (Etsy made good on it for her). The reason she ordered the table was because of the three legged bench. She has a young son and was concerned that he would turn over a two legged bench. This one appeared to give her the stability that she wanted. My reply, “I can help!” After seeing the picture of the table she ordered I told her to give me a few days and I could find her an alternative. So I went out to one of my trusted bloggers, Rogue Engineer and found the table I wanted to build. Please check out his site and follow him on social media. After getting her approval of the style and layout, we agreed on a price and some minor adjustments to the plans. She only wanted a 7 foot table and she only wanted one bench, but that bench needed a third leg. So I made the size adjustments and quoted the table. Now the “Curve” A couple of days after we agreed on the project my client called and said she had an idea on the way to work. She needed to find a way to get her son to the dinner table. “Can I add a 1½” wide by 1/8th inch deep race track around the top of the table?” After I caught my breath and recovered I gave her some alternative ideas to avoid creating a race track into what I knew was going to be a beautiful table. She was convinced this is what she wanted, so I said well, this is why we call ourselves Bayne CUSTOM Woodworking. So I agreed and then the adventure began. The Build Instead of recreating what Rogue Engineer already did I will refer you to his free plans on his site. See the link in the opening paragraph.  He will provide the materials list needed. Below I will outline the changes I made and how I built the table and bench. While not huge changes, there are some that I made to meet the client’s requests and some to add my own unique style. The plans call for a table that is 110” while I made mine to fit the client request of 84”. Because I trimmed my boards I ended up with a 40” wide top instead of a 42” wide. She wanted only one bench so I made an 80” bench with 3 legs instead of the 2 legged bench. Let me also state up front that I rarely, if ever, use pine to build anymore, but I did use it on the job because

If you want your table top -- any table top -- to actually ast without bowing/cupping/twisting, you MUST attach it in a manner that allows for seasonal wood movement. Wood is an organic product, and it naturally expands and contracts with changes in temperature and humidity. I'll post link below to a couple of options that you can cheaply buy which will allow you to securely attach a tabletop while still giving the wood the flexibility to move with the seasons. When you buy decently-made furniture at a store, they all accommodate for this one way or another. Don't just screw the top down to the legs or the skirt...you'll regret it later on.
Just redid my dining room table with this technique and I an observation/suggestion others might find helpful. The boards did not line up well putting it together upside down, even on a flat concrete floor with me standing on the boards while they were screwed. I would have combined biscuits with the pocket holes to ensure a better alignment of the boards. Lots of sanding was required after assembly, and this might not be a huge deal with pine, but I used hard maple so it was quite a chore even with a belt sander. Also, be aware that the 1x2s around the edge may not line up perfectly -- I had to trim about an eighth inch from each side after assembly to get nice smooth, even edges. Not a big deal, but the top turned out a little smaller than the specifications I was give by SheWhoMustBeObeyed. Otherwise our table now looks great, and thank you for the post!
I've used these to turn a dozen bowls so from everything to Paduk, zebrawood, cherry, olive wood, etc. and They require sharpening maybe once a bowl. They are easy enough to hand sharpen using a work sharp, and generally last me throughout the entire bowl. The only gouge I have used that is much nicer is the Easy Wood Tools replaceable tip gouges that are super sharp and make quick work of any bowl. Those cost as much per gouge as this entire set...so this is definitely a good beginner set to start your turning arsenal. I plan to supplement a few Easy Wood scrapers into my set.
Hey Great Article,Thanks. 4 months ago, I started looking for woodworking.The industry is extremely interesting,but I have problems with how I can do it.My uncle who has been doing more than me in this industry,has suggested to me to follow Teds plans.Do you think it’s a good move to follow these plans??I keep reading good reviews about Teds plans but I am unsure if it will still work on me.At this time I can purchase these plans at a very low price,so if possible can you leave me feedback on wether I should do it or not. It would mean a lot coming from an expert in this field.
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​Luckily, we have also managed to find a detailed video tutorial of the Barn door project that illustrates the process of building a Barn door of your own. The steps and instructions in the video tutorial are different from the source links listed above. Actually, you can make different types of designs for your Barn door depending on which one you can afford easily and DIY on your own.
Drill four 5/8-in.-dia. 1/2-in.-deep holes on the large disc?inside the traced circle?then use 5/8-in. dowel centers to transfer the hole locations to the underside of the small disc. Drill four 1/2-in.-deep holes on the underside of the small disc and a 1/2-in.-deep hole in the center of the top for the dowel handle. Glue in the dowels to join the discs, and glue in the handle. We drilled a wood ball for a handle knob, but a screw-on ceramic knob also provides a comfortable, attractive grip.
Up to now, I had been completely focused on the upward-facing portion of the tabletop, the side that would be most visible. But as I drew nearer to the finish line, I started to doubt my earlier decision not to finish the bottom side too. So I went back and did the extra work, and though this additional step might have been unnecessary, I like to think it helped make the table fit better into its home for the summer, my front porch. All that was left now was to attach the top to the metal table. As easy as it was to finish the tabletop with Minwax, it was no mean feat to devise a way of securing the top to the base. Ultimately, the answer to my problem came in an unlikely form. On a typical day, electrical cable hardware would never have entered my mind, but as the result of a funny twist of fate—the same sort of coincidence that led me to undertake this project in the first place—these simple snap-and-click fasteners enabled me to attach the top to the base and call it day. Now, with this project under my belt, I’m starting to eye those 2x6s still lingering in my scrap pile!

The next important hand tool for the woodworker is an accurate tape measure. Get a retractable one that is at least 25 feet long. Any longer than that, and you start having problems getting it to roll back up. Since measurements on large scale projects can be very susceptible to even the most minute measurement variations, you’ll want to make sure the “hook” or tab at the end of the is firmly attached, with no give. When they get loose, you’ll have as much as 1/8” variation in your measurements. This can add up to some severe accuracy problems in the long run.
If you can beg or borrow a pocket hole jig you dont have to predrill holes. I haven’t done a table top other than a workbench(Plywood!) but I have done cabinets and beds. The Kreg jig makes joining easy. A lighter stain colour would cut down on the grain marks, or a heavier application like an espresso stain. I will throw you a pic when I finish my table and show you what I mean.
Check out our most recent woodworking tools and accessory reviews below. We have thousands of satisfied customers that use our router bits, shaper cutters, router tables, and many more fine woodworking tools every day. Take a minute to read what your fellow woodworkers have to say about their experience with our company and our quality woodworking tools. All reviews are from real customers of Infinity Tools who were polled by our partners at ShopperApproved.com. More third party reviews can be found at Shopper Approved's website.
Check out our most recent woodworking tools and accessory reviews below. We have thousands of satisfied customers that use our router bits, shaper cutters, router tables, and many more fine woodworking tools every day. Take a minute to read what your fellow woodworkers have to say about their experience with our company and our quality woodworking tools. All reviews are from real customers of Infinity Tools who were polled by our partners at ShopperApproved.com. More third party reviews can be found at Shopper Approved's website.
Work at a place where you’re required to wear a steel-toe boot? Then listen up. Wolverine just introduced a new boot that’s much more comfortable but still offers solid impact protection. Instead of steel, CarbonMAX boots have a protective cap made of carbon nanotubes, making them lighter and thinner. And if anyone knows about making comfortable work boots, it’s Wolverine—they’ve been making them for more than 130 years.
Reclaimed Wood from Corn Crib HOW TO DESIGN AND BUILD AN ENTRY WAY COAT RACK AND BENCH There was a door in granddad’s home the client wanted to preserve and wondered, if they provided the wood, could I build an entryway coat rack and bench using the door as part of the build. The wood they wanted to provide, well, that was from the family owned Tennessee corn crib that had been torn down and they didn’t want to lose the wood or the memories. Not only was this a corncrib but it was eventually used by the great grandchildren as a play house. So for the client there are as many memories in this build as there are colors. THIS PROJECT TRULY DEFINES THE “CUSTOM” in BAYNE CUSTOM WOODWORKING. I spent some time to design a simple layout in @sketchup_official so the client could approve the idea I had in mind. The wood showed up in two deliveries so we stacked it outside because this was the first time I worked with barn wood. I did not want to introduce possible termites to my shop. So my first call was to my pest guy asking how I would treat the wood for termites. Much to my relief he said I had nothing to worry about. This was “real” wood! Not nominal at all, nominal is how we buy our wood at a local hardware store. Where a 2×4 is actually 1 ½  x 3 ½ . These 2×4’s were at least 2”x4”’s if not more and were hard, heavy and dusty, did I say heavy? After cutting to length on my handy @DewaltTough miter saw, I had to take them to my @ridgidpowertools table saw and square up the bottoms only.  I was very careful not to lose any of the original saw marks and character because that would ruin the entire purpose. For someone who likes clean, crisp edges, this was a bit of a challenge. I used @kregjig Kreg Jig® K4 Master System to join all the pieces of the base, the seat frame and the supports to join the two together. I was very careful to hide all of the pocket holes so they could not be seen from any angle. I used Titebond Products original interior wood glue to join all the pieces together. The next item was to assemble the back which included grandad’s door as the center piece. The door was only 71 ½ tall which determined the overall height of the project. Part of this back also includes two live edge pieces that we picked to use as the “L” shaped wings or side walls. The door measured 24” which left me with 6” on each side to make up the final size of 36”. So I chose two of the straightest boards that were closest to 6” and cut them to width so as not to waste any wood or lose any character. I used the Kreg Jig® K4 Master System
We recently upgraded a wheelbarrow with Simply Dump It pivoting handles. They slid right over the handles and took about five minutes to install. If you’re tall, you probably hunch over when you roll your wheelbarrow around the yard so you don’t end up nose-diving the wheel guard/brace into the ground, resulting in messy spills and the occasional expletive. The Simply Dump It handles raise the grip location a few inches, which lowers the handles, which in turn raises the front wheel brace. The handles not only prevent sudden stopping syndrome but also make the wheelbarrow easier to control, especially on rough terrain. And the pivoting action all but eliminates the awkward torque on your wrists when you empty the wheelbarrow. You can get Simply Dump It handles online.
After all slots are cut, stand each board on end and coat the edge of jointed side with wood glue. Next coat the biscuits with glue. Insert biscuits in one side only of each board, then insert glued biscuits in the empty joint of the next board. Assemble planks in order until the top is complete. Don't worry about small gaps. Next, carefully lay the top down and attach pipe clamps at roughly 1' intervals. Slowly tighten each pipe clamp in a consistent fashion until the gaps disappear*. Small amounts of glue can be removed when dry; scrape up any puddled glue with a plastic putty knife. To minimize sanding later, avoid working glue into the top of the wood. Let the top set overnight.
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To corral shelf-dwelling books or DVDs that like to wander, cut 3/4-in.-thick hardwood pieces into 6-in. x 6-in. squares. Use a band saw or jigsaw to cut a slot along one edge (with the grain) that’s a smidgen wider than the shelf thickness. Stop the notch 3/4 in. from the other edge. Finish the bookend and slide it on the shelf. Want to build the shelves, too? We’ve got complete plans for great-looking shelves here.
Woodworking power tools include various saws for cutting the wood to size and drills for creating holes. Sand pieces down to the finish you want before you sand with portable sanders. Use drivers to install woodworking fasteners for a durable final piece. Cleverly designed rotary tools feature removable bits that can drill, drive, sand, cut and more, so you can use a single tool to accomplish virtually every task of your project. For a production-level project, nail guns can save you hours or even days depending on the work involved.
Aside from the privacy it offers, a latticework porch trellis is a perfect way to add major curb appeal to your home for $100 or less. The trellis shown here is made of cedar, but any decay-resistant wood like redwood, cypress or treated pine would also be a good option. Constructed with lap joints for a flat surface and an oval cutout for elegance, it’s a far upgrade from traditional premade garden lattice. As long as you have experience working a router, this project’s complexity lies mostly in the time it takes to cut and assemble. Get the instructions complete with detailed illustrations here.
Diablo's 3 piece Adjustable Cabinet Router Bit Set Diablo's 3 piece Adjustable Cabinet Router Bit Set features a rail and stile bit set and a Double Shear raised panel bit. Featuring TiCo carbide with titanium these bits provide a long cutting life and ultra-fine finish. Perma-Shield Diablo's high performance coating reduces friction and build-up on the bits. The ...  More + Product Details Close

There was a big crowd, rocking music, and a lot of excitement over the Extreme Post-it Notes at the 3M booth at the 2018 International Builders Show. Apparently these things stick to wood, hot stuff, cold stuff, wet stuff, brick, metal, plastic pipes, ladders, stair treads, flooring, the side of a truck, copper, tools, siding, co-workers, concrete, tile, drywall, asphalt, house wrap, light fixtures, switches, cabinets, leather belts, windows…well, you get the idea. Post-it Extreme Notes will be available at major retailers beginning in March 2018.
Taking cabinet building to the next level I wanted to take another step in my building and see if I could build a cabinet without the use of screws. My wife found the plans in an old Woodsmith Magazine and asked me to build the largest bookcase of the set. My plan was to build the entire cabinet using dowels instead of screws, dado slots instead of pocket hole joinery and biscuit joints. Using rough oak purchased from a local lumber mill, I milled and sized the lumber to the specifications to create this book cabinet with 5 shelves. It was time to replace a number of older pine book cases in the house. Instead of using the traditional pocket hole joinery, the sides, shelves, doors and face frame were all joined using 3/8” dowels,biscuit joints, dados and glue. I used tempered glass for the doors for safety which I was able to purchase locally. The glass vendor recommended using silicone caulk to secure each pane before applying a few small mirror catches on all the sides. The doors were each hung with 3 Ball-Tip Full Back-to-Back Wrap-Around Inset Hinges. Finished with Minwax English Chestnut and homemade wiping polyurethane, this cabinet will stand the test of time and hopefully become a keepsake that is passed down through generations. *DISCLOSURE: Some of the links in this post are affiliate links. If you chose to click through and make a purchase I will earn a commission but there is no additional cost to you. It helps compensates the business for the time spent creating these posts. THANK YOU! 

Woodworking power tools include various saws for cutting the wood to size and drills for creating holes. Sand pieces down to the finish you want before you sand with portable sanders. Use drivers to install woodworking fasteners for a durable final piece. Cleverly designed rotary tools feature removable bits that can drill, drive, sand, cut and more, so you can use a single tool to accomplish virtually every task of your project. For a production-level project, nail guns can save you hours or even days depending on the work involved.
Buying a pack of pre-organized furniture and project plans if you’re new to learning is beneficial for several reasons. Firstly, the packs of plans allow you to access a constant source of instructional content from wherever you are, whether you’re in your shop or want to browse for ideas. There are many plan sources out there and huge amounts of plans being produced and being posted online and in forums each day. By paying a small fee to take advantage of organized woodworking resources, it is easy to learn the best techniques faster and begin making projects you will use for a lifetime.
Thanks for the feedback. We’re glad you found the list helpful. Please note that this page contains only 10 of the 40 top tools for woodworking, displaying only hand tools. You can find the next 10 here: https://www.wagnermeters.com/top-40-woodworking-tools-2/. There are links at the bottom of each article to the next group of tools so you can view the entire list. Hope this helps.

Some moisture meters have pins that penetrate the surface of the wood. This can leave tiny holes that mar the surface and require filling. Others are pin-less. They have sensing plates that scan the wood beneath. However, not all pinless moisture meters are the same – look for one that uses technology that is not affected by the surface moisture in the wood, such as Wagner Meters IntelliSense™ Technology Moisture Meters.


I used a dry brush, barely dipped it in paint, and then lightly brushed it over the wood. If you get too much coverage with the paint, sandpaper is your best friend! You can stain the wood if you want a darker look peeking out from underneath. Check out the stain in this DIY post, it’s a great way to get that aged look quickly: http://www.jasonandshawnda.com/foodiebride/archives/11310 

A layout square, or combination square, comes in 6” and 12” sizes. Most woodworkers use the 6” model, simply because it’s easiest to carry around. Also, most of the stock you’ll use will be no bigger than 6” wide, so 12” is overkill. The layout square is a triangle that you can use to mark square cuts on stock. Once you measure the length of the cut, you line up the layout square with the edge of the board. The short side will give you a straight, square cut across the end grain. You can also measure off angles with the layout square. This helps when you’re trying to measure for a bevel on a table saw, or marking a cut for a miter saw. You can even use your layout square to determine an existing angle. Just be sure to buy one made of metal. The plastic ones are not only fragile, but they also can warp, making them pretty useless.

Okay, let’s stain this beast. I should explain that we used Rustoleum’s Dark Walnut Ultimate Wood Stain, but we did it wrong. We failed to mix it well before applying it, resulting in a color we really liked–but not the color this stain is designed to create. When we came back to do a second coat, we stirred it well, resulting in a coat that looked like purple paint. I had to sand it off and start over. So, don’t follow my lead here–follow the can’s directions and TEST before staining all of your new masterpiece!


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Clean wooden gutters of any loose debris and cut to a manageable length. Miter down to form an approximately 40" x 94" rectangle. Coat the corners with wood glue and fasten together with 15-gauge finish nails. If miters are tight 45-degree cuts, box should be square. Double check diagonal measurements before fastening completely. The two diagonal measurements should be as close to equal as possible.
I started by doing some searches around the ol’ internet to find other folks who’ve built their own tables. Using the images and information I found, I started drawing up plans. My table is approximately 6’x44″x31″ (LxWxH). You may find different dimensions work better for you (31″ is pretty tall)–so make your plans however you like. I also built leaves that make the table 8.5’ long.
Check out our most recent woodworking tools and accessory reviews below. We have thousands of satisfied customers that use our router bits, shaper cutters, router tables, and many more fine woodworking tools every day. Take a minute to read what your fellow woodworkers have to say about their experience with our company and our quality woodworking tools. All reviews are from real customers of Infinity Tools who were polled by our partners at ShopperApproved.com. More third party reviews can be found at Shopper Approved's website.
There was a big crowd, rocking music, and a lot of excitement over the Extreme Post-it Notes at the 3M booth at the 2018 International Builders Show. Apparently these things stick to wood, hot stuff, cold stuff, wet stuff, brick, metal, plastic pipes, ladders, stair treads, flooring, the side of a truck, copper, tools, siding, co-workers, concrete, tile, drywall, asphalt, house wrap, light fixtures, switches, cabinets, leather belts, windows…well, you get the idea. Post-it Extreme Notes will be available at major retailers beginning in March 2018.
With a collection of workshop tools--whether for construction jobs or for around the DIY house projects--it’s top priority to make sure all of your tools are in the best shape and are taken care of. Tools don’t come at a cheap price, so proper care is essential in order for them to last for a long time. Unfortunately, after much usage, wear, tear, and rusting of tools tend to happen. Luckily, at Bora Tools, we sell a vast variety of workshop accessories that are specific to cleaning and restoring needs. From waxes, polishes, rust removers, to covers, racks, and more, we have an abundance of products that are designed to keep your high-quality, expensive tools in prime condition all year round.
Ridgid has a new C-style close-quarter tubing cutter that slices through both 1/2-in. and 3/4-in. tubing, which means one less tool to carry and fumble around for. The cutting wheel is spring loaded so it needs no adjustment as you spin the cutter, and the outside surface has screwdriver slots for getting leverage in tight spaces. The 1/2 – 3/4 Rigid tubing cutter costs $32 and is available at plumbing supply stores and online retailers.

Probably the next most useful shop accessory is a large work table. I like to use a portable table that can be moved around the shop as needed. This particular table, which you can build by clicking on the link above, is lightweight yet sturdy and has retractable casters. When you want to move the table, simply lift each end and the casters lock into place to allow the table to roll. Once you get it into position, pull the cord on each end and the casters retract, so the table won't move.
There’s a lot of space above the shelf in most closets. Even though it’s a little hard to reach, it’s a great place to store seldom-used items. Make use of this wasted space by adding a second shelf above the existing one. Buy enough closet shelving material to match the length of the existing shelf plus enough for two end supports and middle supports over each bracket. Twelve-inch-wide shelving is available in various lengths and finishes at home centers and lumberyards.
Reclaimed Wood from Corn Crib HOW TO DESIGN AND BUILD AN ENTRY WAY COAT RACK AND BENCH There was a door in granddad’s home the client wanted to preserve and wondered, if they provided the wood, could I build an entryway coat rack and bench using the door as part of the build. The wood they wanted to provide, well, that was from the family owned Tennessee corn crib that had been torn down and they didn’t want to lose the wood or the memories. Not only was this a corncrib but it was eventually used by the great grandchildren as a play house. So for the client there are as many memories in this build as there are colors. THIS PROJECT TRULY DEFINES THE “CUSTOM” in BAYNE CUSTOM WOODWORKING. I spent some time to design a simple layout in @sketchup_official so the client could approve the idea I had in mind. The wood showed up in two deliveries so we stacked it outside because this was the first time I worked with barn wood. I did not want to introduce possible termites to my shop. So my first call was to my pest guy asking how I would treat the wood for termites. Much to my relief he said I had nothing to worry about. This was “real” wood! Not nominal at all, nominal is how we buy our wood at a local hardware store. Where a 2×4 is actually 1 ½  x 3 ½ . These 2×4’s were at least 2”x4”’s if not more and were hard, heavy and dusty, did I say heavy? After cutting to length on my handy @DewaltTough miter saw, I had to take them to my @ridgidpowertools table saw and square up the bottoms only.  I was very careful not to lose any of the original saw marks and character because that would ruin the entire purpose. For someone who likes clean, crisp edges, this was a bit of a challenge. I used @kregjig Kreg Jig® K4 Master System to join all the pieces of the base, the seat frame and the supports to join the two together. I was very careful to hide all of the pocket holes so they could not be seen from any angle. I used Titebond Products original interior wood glue to join all the pieces together. The next item was to assemble the back which included grandad’s door as the center piece. The door was only 71 ½ tall which determined the overall height of the project. Part of this back also includes two live edge pieces that we picked to use as the “L” shaped wings or side walls. The door measured 24” which left me with 6” on each side to make up the final size of 36”. So I chose two of the straightest boards that were closest to 6” and cut them to width so as not to waste any wood or lose any character. I used the Kreg Jig® K4 Master System

Example Entertainment Center: $25 for plans + $750 for materials + $1200 for good quality tools = $1975. Less than a few grand! Of course you don't have to buy brand new tools; search the sale lists online (i.e. Craigslist, Freecycle.org, etc.) in your area. You are sure to find some good deals on power tools and even materials! (A good set of tools includes a table saw, miter saw, nail gun and compressor and four piece cordless tool set.)
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