Nightstand table plans have everything you need to create a bedside table to keep every needy thing at reach at night time. This Nigh Stand plan is quite different in design from the most of the other plans. This stand has not only the three regular drawers but also having a hidden drawer that uses a secret locking mechanism to keep contents securely.
Let’s start with perhaps the most basic tool in every household – the claw hammer. The claw on one side of the head should be well counterbalanced by the finished head, which should be somewhat rounded. The other kind of head is the waffle-head. Most commonly used in construction, it leaves a distinctive waffle mark on the wood when you drive the nail. This, of course, is not the proper nail for woodworking.

Bought 2 of these, one for the wife and one for me. We have a project we are doing that required cutting lots of MDF(medium density fiberboard) which is not good for you to breathe or get in your eyes (very tiny particles). I picked these because people said they worked well with glasses (which i wear) and because they had full protection from flying debris and also from the airborne dust.


With a collection of workshop tools--whether for construction jobs or for around the DIY house projects--it’s top priority to make sure all of your tools are in the best shape and are taken care of. Tools don’t come at a cheap price, so proper care is essential in order for them to last for a long time. Unfortunately, after much usage, wear, tear, and rusting of tools tend to happen. Luckily, at Bora Tools, we sell a vast variety of workshop accessories that are specific to cleaning and restoring needs. From waxes, polishes, rust removers, to covers, racks, and more, we have an abundance of products that are designed to keep your high-quality, expensive tools in prime condition all year round.
The end grain of wood soaks up finishes and often turns much darker than the face grain. Check for this on your test block. If you get an ugly result, pretreat the end grain with a dose of finish that will limit absorption (wood conditioner, sanding sealer, shellac or polyurethane thinned 50 percent). Apply the treatment with an artist’s brush and be careful not to slop onto the face grain.
With all boards sitting in your main pipe clamps ready to come together under pressure, apply smaller clamps across each joint at all board ends. This aligns the boards perfectly, at least at the ends, anyway. Depending on how your boards behave along the rest of their length, you may or may not need cauls. These curved pieces of wood get clamped across the glue-up, top and bottom, aligning the boards vertically and minimizing steps between them. I use 1” x 4” lengths of hardwood for cauls, with one edge planed to a curve so the ends measure about 2 1/2” wide.
Do you have older 18V DeWalt tools that are still near and dear to your heart but need new batteries? Consider firing up those old tools with 21st century technology. Now, 18V tools can be run on powerful 20V lithium Ion batteries with DeWalt’s new battery adapter. The adapter slides into the tool and the battery hooks onto the adapter. It works on most 18V DeWalt tools but not all. It’s sold two ways: the adapter alone (DCA1820), or the adapter with two compact 20V, 2.OAh batteries and charger. Now you’ll be able to hold on to your favorite cordless reciprocating saw forever!
No sadly, as I mentioned above, my table top ended up splitting, starting at a knot on the edge and going clear across the top (pre-drill those holes!!!), so I had to come up with another solution.  I didn’t want to go to the trouble of making another table top like this one, so I did a much easier and quicker solution…stain-grade plywood with decorative moulding attached to the edges. 
Here’s an old woodworking adage I enjoy ignoring: “measure twice, cut once.” Honestly, I measure nonce and cut thrice. I often eyeball it. I use pieces I’ve already cut to measure what I need to cut. It’s not a great habit, but I prefer it to measuring everything. And the results usually aren’t that different. At least that’s what I tell myself. I ended up having to sand down the ends of the 2×12’s running the length of the table (where they meet the aprons) because they weren’t exactly the same length.
There are lots of clear finishes. But for a combination of usability and durability, you can’t beat polyurethane. Oil-based poly, which dries slower than water-based, is best for beginners because it allows more working time. The other important difference is clarity: Water-based poly is absolutely colorless, while oil-based has an amber tone, which can be good or bad depending on the look you want.
Whether you are just getting started or you simply want to hone your wood work skills, you can locate many online sources that can be extremely helpful. Online plan collections are gaining popularity and enthusiastic builders are keen to improve their skills in a convenient way, given the busy lifestyles we often find ourselves leading with a lack of time and ideas. Thanks to the people who have organized plans with technology and the internet, it is now possible to find a huge variety of woodworking projects online from the comfort of your shop or livingroom. Some of the finest guides on the net can help you become an expert woodworker surprisingly quickly, you just have to work at it.
If you want your table top -- any table top -- to actually ast without bowing/cupping/twisting, you MUST attach it in a manner that allows for seasonal wood movement. Wood is an organic product, and it naturally expands and contracts with changes in temperature and humidity. I'll post link below to a couple of options that you can cheaply buy which will allow you to securely attach a tabletop while still giving the wood the flexibility to move with the seasons. When you buy decently-made furniture at a store, they all accommodate for this one way or another. Don't just screw the top down to the legs or the skirt...you'll regret it later on.
After all slots are cut, stand each board on end and coat the edge of jointed side with wood glue. Next coat the biscuits with glue. Insert biscuits in one side only of each board, then insert glued biscuits in the empty joint of the next board. Assemble planks in order until the top is complete. Don't worry about small gaps. Next, carefully lay the top down and attach pipe clamps at roughly 1' intervals. Slowly tighten each pipe clamp in a consistent fashion until the gaps disappear*. Small amounts of glue can be removed when dry; scrape up any puddled glue with a plastic putty knife. To minimize sanding later, avoid working glue into the top of the wood. Let the top set overnight.
Breaking down heavy sheet-goods on a jobsite table saw is difficult, and dang near impossible when working alone. That’s where a track saw comes in handy. A good quality track saw can produce cabinet saw results out on any job. Now, this portable tool is even more portable. The FESTOOL TSC 55 is a cordless saw that has the same features and performs just as well as FESTOOL’s corded saw, including the cut capacity and blade speed. It also has a collection bag that actually works, collecting up to 90% of the dust. The batteries are compatible with other FESTOOL products and the saw runs on their standard tracks.
Photographer/filmmaker Brett Foxwell, who has expertise with both stop-motion and time-lapse techniques, created this very surprising video by shaving logs down layer-by-layer, then stitching still shots of the cross-sections together: WoodSwimmer from bfophoto on Vimeo.Writes Foxwell: I became fascinated with the possibilities of a sci-fi world based on the
Work at a place where you’re required to wear a steel-toe boot? Then listen up. Wolverine just introduced a new boot that’s much more comfortable but still offers solid impact protection. Instead of steel, CarbonMAX boots have a protective cap made of carbon nanotubes, making them lighter and thinner. And if anyone knows about making comfortable work boots, it’s Wolverine—they’ve been making them for more than 130 years.
Screwdrivers are another must-have in the woodworker’s set of hand tools. Not only will you need Phillips and slot, or flathead screwdrivers, you’ll need star drivers and Torx drivers, too. A quality construction is vital to a good set of screwdrivers. So many of them are made out of soft metal, and the first time you put any “oomph” behind them, they strip out, becoming absolutely useless.

A review of the Dewalt dwp615 The Problem Using a router inside the shop makes for a dusty shop. In the past when using my hand held trim or plunge router I would roll the projects out of the shop to avoid the mess. While this is fine in good weather, when it gets cold or rains it’s not an option so I use the tool inside and clean up the mess afterwards. The Solution I located a dust collection for my Dewalt dwp611 trim router and the dnp612 plunge base unit on Amazon and purchased the dnp615 and the dnp616. See my YouTube channel for the actual test and review. I tested them both with cedar because it is a wood that makes the most dust in my shop. Installation was easier than expected and fit into both bases. Using the trim base I was able to use the round over bit without any issues to achieve a clean cut and eliminate 85-90% of the dust. I did find the unit attached to the plunge base would not allow round over bits to extend deep enough to make a good cut, but with a straight bit it works great. Both Amazon links are available are below I would say this is a successful purchase and has eliminated the majority of the dust put out by the router. *DISCLOSURE: Some of the links below are affiliate links. If you chose to click through and make a purchase I will earn a commission but there is no additional cost to you. It helps compensates the business for the time spent creating these posts. THANK YOU!    
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Turning over the sturdy tabletop, I felt a thrill of vindication. Clearly, it wasn’t a mistake in the end to use all three stains for the same project. Before I could consider the job done, though, I would need to apply sealer—Minwax Helmsman Spar Urethane—to protect the wood from moisture, UV rays, and the wear and tear of day-to-day life. This was my first time experimenting with a spray-application sealer, and I loved it. Obviously, it’s important to have proper ventilation in your work area, and you’ve got to shake the can vigorously before spraying, but so long as you remember the basics, spraying couldn’t be more straightforward. Holding the Helmsman Spar Urethane can about a foot from the surface, spray in a series of even strokes, always in the same direction, until you’ve completed the first coat. Let the sealer dry for about four hours before applying any additional coats, and for best results, sand the entire surface before each application of a new layer.
Leave your tabletop longer than necessary until the sanding is done, then cut to final length. Most tabletops are too wide to trim on a tablesaw, even with a crosscut sled, and this is where I use a hand-held circular saw. Clamp a guide strip so it’s square to one edge, then follow it with your saw. Repeat the process on the other end, then carefully use your hand-held belt sander to remove any blade marks on edges. It sounds like a coarse process, but you can get great results this way.
Clamp curved caul edges inwards so they align tabletop boards in the middle, then torque up the main clamps to draw the boards together. If the width of boards you’re using allow it, pre-glue boards for your tabletop in sections that are just narrow enough to fit within your thickness planer. Run these through the planer to clean and level the glue joints, then move back to clamps for final glue up. Working in stages like this reduces the number of glue joints you need to sand smooth and level later.
Reclaimed Wood from Corn Crib HOW TO DESIGN AND BUILD AN ENTRY WAY COAT RACK AND BENCH There was a door in granddad’s home the client wanted to preserve and wondered, if they provided the wood, could I build an entryway coat rack and bench using the door as part of the build. The wood they wanted to provide, well, that was from the family owned Tennessee corn crib that had been torn down and they didn’t want to lose the wood or the memories. Not only was this a corncrib but it was eventually used by the great grandchildren as a play house. So for the client there are as many memories in this build as there are colors. THIS PROJECT TRULY DEFINES THE “CUSTOM” in BAYNE CUSTOM WOODWORKING. I spent some time to design a simple layout in @sketchup_official so the client could approve the idea I had in mind. The wood showed up in two deliveries so we stacked it outside because this was the first time I worked with barn wood. I did not want to introduce possible termites to my shop. So my first call was to my pest guy asking how I would treat the wood for termites. Much to my relief he said I had nothing to worry about. This was “real” wood! Not nominal at all, nominal is how we buy our wood at a local hardware store. Where a 2×4 is actually 1 ½  x 3 ½ . These 2×4’s were at least 2”x4”’s if not more and were hard, heavy and dusty, did I say heavy? After cutting to length on my handy @DewaltTough miter saw, I had to take them to my @ridgidpowertools table saw and square up the bottoms only.  I was very careful not to lose any of the original saw marks and character because that would ruin the entire purpose. For someone who likes clean, crisp edges, this was a bit of a challenge. I used @kregjig Kreg Jig® K4 Master System to join all the pieces of the base, the seat frame and the supports to join the two together. I was very careful to hide all of the pocket holes so they could not be seen from any angle. I used Titebond Products original interior wood glue to join all the pieces together. The next item was to assemble the back which included grandad’s door as the center piece. The door was only 71 ½ tall which determined the overall height of the project. Part of this back also includes two live edge pieces that we picked to use as the “L” shaped wings or side walls. The door measured 24” which left me with 6” on each side to make up the final size of 36”. So I chose two of the straightest boards that were closest to 6” and cut them to width so as not to waste any wood or lose any character. I used the Kreg Jig® K4 Master System 

Diablo's Adjustable Rail and Stile Router Bit Sets Diablo's Adjustable Rail and Stile Router Bit Sets create perfect fitting rail and stile doors for 5/8 in. to 1-1/4 in. stock. Featuring TiCo carbide with titanium these bits provide a long cutting life and ultra-fine finish. Perma-shield Diablo's high performance coating reduces friction and build-up on the bits. The ...  More + Product Details Close

​Every project needs some tools and material to build on. The tools and material you will need in this plan include Miter saw, jigsaw, measuring tape screws and screwdriver etc. We will suggest you take high-quality material for the plan. Read the source tutorial and watch the video tutorial below for more details. Follow all the steps properly to make a nice and strong Rustic cooler. The tutorial explains the procedure for building this awesome gift. Make sure to use the only high-quality material for any woodworking project.


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There are lots of clear finishes. But for a combination of usability and durability, you can’t beat polyurethane. Oil-based poly, which dries slower than water-based, is best for beginners because it allows more working time. The other important difference is clarity: Water-based poly is absolutely colorless, while oil-based has an amber tone, which can be good or bad depending on the look you want.
It is becoming more popular in this DIY age for people to want to make things themselves, and we are seeing a return to woodworking as a hobby or pastime. The garage is transformed into a workshop, with a workbench a set of woodworking tools and of course a beer fridge. Beautiful handmade woodworking projects can be achieved with some practice, a good set of plans and the right woodworking tools.
And if you haven’t got a fancy stencil hanging around, you can still give your table a stencil-styled makeover, and it won’t take much.  To make this fun herringbone table, Shark Tails took a boring side table and taped off a herringbone design then spray painted it gold!  It adds a touch of mod glam that’s not overwhelming since it’s in a small dose. // Shark Tails
Check out our most recent woodworking tools and accessory reviews below. We have thousands of satisfied customers that use our router bits, shaper cutters, router tables, and many more fine woodworking tools every day. Take a minute to read what your fellow woodworkers have to say about their experience with our company and our quality woodworking tools. All reviews are from real customers of Infinity Tools who were polled by our partners at ShopperApproved.com. More third party reviews can be found at Shopper Approved's website.
Some tools required to build a picture frame are a table saw, miter saw, measuring tape, wood glue etc. A table saw with a backing board and miter gauge can be used to get the right angle and lengths of picture frame every time. You can use builders square to arrange the final cut pieces before nailing, screwing or gluing. Check out the video tutorial below for more details.
Working on one side at a time, glue and nail the side to the back. Apply glue and drive three 1-5/8-in. nails into each shelf, attach the other side and nail those shelves into place to secure them. Clamps are helpful to hold the unit together while you’re driving nails. Center the top piece, leaving a 2-in. overhang on both sides, and glue and nail it into place. Paint or stain the unit and then drill pilot holes into the top face of each side of the unit and screw in the hooks to hold your ironing board. Mount the shelf on drywall using screw-in wall anchors.

After all slots are cut, stand each board on end and coat the edge of jointed side with wood glue. Next coat the biscuits with glue. Insert biscuits in one side only of each board, then insert glued biscuits in the empty joint of the next board. Assemble planks in order until the top is complete. Don't worry about small gaps. Next, carefully lay the top down and attach pipe clamps at roughly 1' intervals. Slowly tighten each pipe clamp in a consistent fashion until the gaps disappear*. Small amounts of glue can be removed when dry; scrape up any puddled glue with a plastic putty knife. To minimize sanding later, avoid working glue into the top of the wood. Let the top set overnight.


Furnishing and decorating your patio is not an easy task – but then again, it has to be done! Your patio is obviously one of the most important rooms in your home, as you can easily turn it into your little piece of Heaven, your “safe spot” in your home where you can retreat whenever you want to ignore the world and just spend some time alone all by yourself.
For this project you need a table base. An old table with no top would be perfect. The idea is to create a new wood top with an original design. Since this project is for an outdoor table, you can also include an ice bucket in the middle. Find some large pieces of wood and put them together to make a top. Make a hole for the bucket if you want one and insert it. Then, to make the edges of the table, use a belt sander. Get creative until you’re happy with the results and, at the end, stain the table.{found on thehuntedinterior}.

We call them strongbacks and we use them on every tabletop we build. It's just a scrap strip of 3/4" plywood, with 3/4" pocket holes drilled about ever few inches. The strongback is attached to the bottom of the tabletop as the glue dries. The square edge of the plywood prevents the tabletop from warping or cupping as it dries. Then we remove the strongbacks (and save them for the next tabletop) when we attach the tabletop to the base.
The next hand tool every woodworker should have is a nail set. In fact, you should have several sizes. They look like awls, and you use them to drive nail heads into the wood so they are flush or right below the surface. This allows you to fill the holes and prepare for staining or painting. The nail setter will usually have either a convex or concave surface to grip the nail better and keep it from sliding off and marring the wood.
Be sure wood is dry. Material from a job site or floor joists that existed in a crawlspace may have high moisture content; material from a conditioned space should be dry. Wood can be dried in a kiln (ask your local lumber mill) or stored inside through the winter. If time does not permit, stack wood in a hot dry place with 1" spacers between layers. Allow to dry for a minimum of two weeks.
A piece of 1/2” plywood offers the best approach for determining the optimal size and shape of your tabletop because it lets you test and tweak various options in 3D. Cut the plywood to the maximum size you might want, set it up on something in the place where the finished table will go, then live with it for a while. Should the top be narrower? Shorter? Now’s the time to find out. Saw some off your plywood mock-up if need be, then live with the new size until you’ve found the sweet spot.
Pallet tables are very common and very easy to make. To make it you’ll need about half of a wood pallet. Decide the dimensions for the table and then remove some of the boards and cut them to size. Reattach them using nails and then sand the table. Then you can stain or seal the wood if you want. At the end, you can either add legs, casters or leave the table as such.{found on hernewleaf}.
Consider building your tabletop out of boards about 6" wide (1x6 or 2x6), or close in size (I use x4 and x8 boards on occasion). If you go smaller, you'll be adding more joints, which means more pocket holes and more sanding. If you go with a wider board, the board itself may cup over time, creating high and low points on your tabletop. I personally find x6 boards to be that happy medium.
A few days back, I was searching for some cool DIY plans. So, I got to work and ended up coming up with some easy to follow project and an awesome new ice chest cooler to have out on the deck! It was going to be perfect for summer hangouts and barbecues. It was a fun and practical plan to work on and I know you will have fun tackling select a design from this plan and start building your own. Enjoy learning how you can build a rustic cooler also sing the video tutorial and source tutorial plan!
This tool is specialized for the task of making shingles. The strange name comes from the antiquated word "froward," which means "away," in reference to the direction that the tool cuts. To use it, place the froe, blade down, on the edge of a log length, then hit the top of the blade with a wooden club, forcing the froe into the log. Next, pull the handle toward you and pry off a thin slice of the log. Voilà... shingle! Since buying a box of square-edged shingles is significantly less effort than making each and every one by hand, this tool has long since passed its heyday. But it still can be used to build up the kindling pile.
After all slots are cut, stand each board on end and coat the edge of jointed side with wood glue. Next coat the biscuits with glue. Insert biscuits in one side only of each board, then insert glued biscuits in the empty joint of the next board. Assemble planks in order until the top is complete. Don't worry about small gaps. Next, carefully lay the top down and attach pipe clamps at roughly 1' intervals. Slowly tighten each pipe clamp in a consistent fashion until the gaps disappear*. Small amounts of glue can be removed when dry; scrape up any puddled glue with a plastic putty knife. To minimize sanding later, avoid working glue into the top of the wood. Let the top set overnight.
There are lots of clear finishes. But for a combination of usability and durability, you can’t beat polyurethane. Oil-based poly, which dries slower than water-based, is best for beginners because it allows more working time. The other important difference is clarity: Water-based poly is absolutely colorless, while oil-based has an amber tone, which can be good or bad depending on the look you want.
The Story of the Farmhouse Table with a Race Track While working my day job one of my managers came to my desk and said “I need your help”. Come to find out she ordered a farmhouse table and bench on Etsy. However the person she ordered it from fell off the face of the earth and left her without a table or her money (Etsy made good on it for her). The reason she ordered the table was because of the three legged bench. She has a young son and was concerned that he would turn over a two legged bench. This one appeared to give her the stability that she wanted. My reply, “I can help!” After seeing the picture of the table she ordered I told her to give me a few days and I could find her an alternative. So I went out to one of my trusted bloggers, Rogue Engineer and found the table I wanted to build. Please check out his site and follow him on social media. After getting her approval of the style and layout, we agreed on a price and some minor adjustments to the plans. She only wanted a 7 foot table and she only wanted one bench, but that bench needed a third leg. So I made the size adjustments and quoted the table. Now the “Curve” A couple of days after we agreed on the project my client called and said she had an idea on the way to work. She needed to find a way to get her son to the dinner table. “Can I add a 1½” wide by 1/8th inch deep race track around the top of the table?” After I caught my breath and recovered I gave her some alternative ideas to avoid creating a race track into what I knew was going to be a beautiful table. She was convinced this is what she wanted, so I said well, this is why we call ourselves Bayne CUSTOM Woodworking. So I agreed and then the adventure began. The Build Instead of recreating what Rogue Engineer already did I will refer you to his free plans on his site. See the link in the opening paragraph.  He will provide the materials list needed. Below I will outline the changes I made and how I built the table and bench. While not huge changes, there are some that I made to meet the client’s requests and some to add my own unique style. The plans call for a table that is 110” while I made mine to fit the client request of 84”. Because I trimmed my boards I ended up with a 40” wide top instead of a 42” wide. She wanted only one bench so I made an 80” bench with 3 legs instead of the 2 legged bench. Let me also state up front that I rarely, if ever, use pine to build anymore, but I did use it on the job because

Although it’s tempting to use a random orbit sander to smooth your table top at the final stages, I never do. Finish quality is the reason why. Random orbit sanders often leave behind swirl marks that don’t show up until finishing time. A better option is to complete the sanding process by hand, using 180-, then 220-grit paper only in the direction of wood grain. The finish of a tabletop is more closely examined than wood finishes anywhere else, so you need to eliminate all flaws.


The engineering involved in building this garden bench is pretty simple, and we have provided some links to get a full cut list and plans with photos to help you along the way. Additionally, to the stock lumber, you will need wood screws, barrel locks, and hinges to complete the table. A miter saw or hand saw is also extremely helpful for cutting down your stock to the correct angle and length. 

Behind every great woodworking piece is a great woodworking plan. Even the classic furniture makers of the 18th and 19th centuries worked from detailed precision drawn plans. This is how we are able to make such genuine looking reproductions of the works of the famous furniture makers of old; the master woodworker’s plans are still extant. Many different styles and designs are available, from all different periods in history, to modern designs from this century. Working with the right woodworking tools a skilled woodworker can make any piece of furniture; however fancy the detail is, if he has an accurate woodworking plan to work from. Once you have reached a certain skill level in your woodworking techniques, you will be able to create a masterpiece which can be handed down through your family for future generations.
Manufacturers that produce woodworking tools and materials have got into the content creation game, too, and some will share woodworking plans online. Minwax and Ryobi, for example, provides their plans free of charge, and Rockler offers their woodworking plans for a fee. Seek them out along with the other blogs and you’ll have a handy list of resources you can turn to for any project.
Every student requires help with homework from time to time. Somebody works part-time and doesn’t have enough time to do all the assignments. Others are not good writing essays and always experience difficulties when they have to complete one more paper. Sometimes, even the best students become too exhausted and don’t have enough energy to write a quality paper. In such moments everybody needs a little help, and Homeworkfor.me is always ready to lend a hand with any academic problem.
Making a garden arched footbridge out of some wood boards can be fun, hard working plan and also it’s quite rewarding. We are providing the project tutorial for how to build an arched footbridge without rails or having rails. If you take your hands of work and have some basic woodworking skills you can easily build this type of bridge. While this garden bridge is too small to walk over but it can make a really stunning addition to your lush yard or garden.
Clamp curved caul edges inwards so they align tabletop boards in the middle, then torque up the main clamps to draw the boards together. If the width of boards you’re using allow it, pre-glue boards for your tabletop in sections that are just narrow enough to fit within your thickness planer. Run these through the planer to clean and level the glue joints, then move back to clamps for final glue up. Working in stages like this reduces the number of glue joints you need to sand smooth and level later. 

Reclaimed Wood from Corn Crib HOW TO DESIGN AND BUILD AN ENTRY WAY COAT RACK AND BENCH There was a door in granddad’s home the client wanted to preserve and wondered, if they provided the wood, could I build an entryway coat rack and bench using the door as part of the build. The wood they wanted to provide, well, that was from the family owned Tennessee corn crib that had been torn down and they didn’t want to lose the wood or the memories. Not only was this a corncrib but it was eventually used by the great grandchildren as a play house. So for the client there are as many memories in this build as there are colors. THIS PROJECT TRULY DEFINES THE “CUSTOM” in BAYNE CUSTOM WOODWORKING. I spent some time to design a simple layout in @sketchup_official so the client could approve the idea I had in mind. The wood showed up in two deliveries so we stacked it outside because this was the first time I worked with barn wood. I did not want to introduce possible termites to my shop. So my first call was to my pest guy asking how I would treat the wood for termites. Much to my relief he said I had nothing to worry about. This was “real” wood! Not nominal at all, nominal is how we buy our wood at a local hardware store. Where a 2×4 is actually 1 ½  x 3 ½ . These 2×4’s were at least 2”x4”’s if not more and were hard, heavy and dusty, did I say heavy? After cutting to length on my handy @DewaltTough miter saw, I had to take them to my @ridgidpowertools table saw and square up the bottoms only.  I was very careful not to lose any of the original saw marks and character because that would ruin the entire purpose. For someone who likes clean, crisp edges, this was a bit of a challenge. I used @kregjig Kreg Jig® K4 Master System to join all the pieces of the base, the seat frame and the supports to join the two together. I was very careful to hide all of the pocket holes so they could not be seen from any angle. I used Titebond Products original interior wood glue to join all the pieces together. The next item was to assemble the back which included grandad’s door as the center piece. The door was only 71 ½ tall which determined the overall height of the project. Part of this back also includes two live edge pieces that we picked to use as the “L” shaped wings or side walls. The door measured 24” which left me with 6” on each side to make up the final size of 36”. So I chose two of the straightest boards that were closest to 6” and cut them to width so as not to waste any wood or lose any character. I used the Kreg Jig® K4 Master System
When you buy the wood, look for pieces that aren’t warped, excessively longer or shorter than the others, and, if you can get lucky, don’t carry the telltale “new wood” planer marks. We purchased the most inexpensive wood that we could find. You’ll likely find them in 2- and 4-ft pieces. If you have a saw at home, you might consider getting the 4 ft pieces to decrease the cost of your project a bit.

I purchased these gloves for work, which involves handling and packing several (thousand) books everyday. When they arrived, they were a little too big for my smallish hands. I figured I would use them anyway to spare my sore fingers, and for the week I used these my hands were safe and papercut-free! The grip dots were secure and helped to grip even thin sheets of paper. The fingers bunched up a bit, but that's to be expected from oversized gloves.


Slice, dice and serve in style on this easy, attractive board. We’ll show you a simple way to dry-fit the parts, scribe the arc and then glue the whole thing together. We used a 4-ft. steel ruler to scribe the arcs, but a yardstick or any thin board would also work. Find complete how-to instructions on this woodworking crafts project here. Also, be sure to use water-resistant wood glue and keep your board out of the dishwasher or it might fall apart. And one more thing: Keep the boards as even as possible during glue-up to minimize sanding later. For great tips on gluing wood, check out this collection.
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