California Air Tools makes great air compressors. One of their most popular models is the 2010A. The aluminum tank makes it light (35-lbs.) and eliminates those stains from rusty water draining from rusty tanks. The oil-free dual-piston pump provides a fast recovery time—fast enough to run a framing gun. It also draws less power and performs well in cold weather. There’s no doubt that you’re going to like all the features of this compressor, but you’re going to love how quiet it is. It runs at about 60-dB, which is about the same as a conversation in a restaurant. So, no more hollering at coworkers or cranking up the radio to hear the music over a screaming compressor.
A super simple iPad Dock/stand made out of a single block of wood features an angled groove which gets to support the tablet device and a cut in a hole to revise access to the home button of your iPad. It’s possible to drill an access channel in the stand through which you can run a charging cable, although this mini stripped back iPad stand may have very limited functions.
This is another very interesting project. To make a similar table you need to have textured spray paint, matte black spray paint, lumber, wood boards, wheels, stain, sand paper, corner pieces, nails, bolts, nuts, washers, clamps and L brackets. First make the measurements and spray paint all the hardware including the wheels. Then make the basic box and sue nails to hold the wood pieces in place. Then use L brackets to keep them sturdy and add the bolts. Tighten the nuts into the bolts and attach the wheels.Then add the corner pieces sing nails{found on theblissfulbeeblog}.
And if you haven’t got a fancy stencil hanging around, you can still give your table a stencil-styled makeover, and it won’t take much.  To make this fun herringbone table, Shark Tails took a boring side table and taped off a herringbone design then spray painted it gold!  It adds a touch of mod glam that’s not overwhelming since it’s in a small dose. // Shark Tails
This is another wood table but this time with a more elaborate design. Instead of using a large log, this time you’ll need several small ones. The idea is to cut them to the same height and to try to create a mosaic with them. You can glue them together and you can also wrap a piece of rope or something similar around them. You should be able to create an original coffee table.

Ridgid has a new C-style close-quarter tubing cutter that slices through both 1/2-in. and 3/4-in. tubing, which means one less tool to carry and fumble around for. The cutting wheel is spring loaded so it needs no adjustment as you spin the cutter, and the outside surface has screwdriver slots for getting leverage in tight spaces. The 1/2 – 3/4 Rigid tubing cutter costs $32 and is available at plumbing supply stores and online retailers.


Before doing anything else, I measured the metal garden table to figure out what size the tabletop would need to be. With those dimensions in mind, I went hunting for scraps. Somewhere in my collection, I was able to find the right combination of 2×4 boards to cover the measured surface area. (Note: If you’ve got a large, motley assortment of wood, you might find it painstaking to cull the pile and piece together suitable boards. To make quicker work of the process, I suggest cutting a template out of cardboard and using it to test different arrangements.) For my part, starting with five 2×4 boards, all roughly the same length, I had to make just a handful of cuts with the circular saw to end up with exactly the right amount of material. In the above photo, those dozen smaller pieces may seem haphazardly strewn about, but when combined, they fit together perfectly to form a tabletop of the desired shape and size.

While the top is drying, measure the thickest portion. Add 1/16” to this measurement and mark a horizontal line with a framing square across the tops of the table legs. This line marks the gutter structure mounting depth. Legs will protrude 1/16” above the plane of the tabletop. Ask a helper to hold the leg tight to the inside corner of the gutter structure with the mark at the top of the gutter. Drive at least two wood screws through the inside face of the gutter into the sides of the leg.
My son asked for his DIY table to be painted green. But I can’t see myself making a wooden table and then painting the whole thing bright green. Sorry buddy, but it will still be great and green with painted layers. Thankfully, Dixie Belle has an amazing selection of colors! I will be painting the table using all of these gorgeous greens. The greens are:
Reclaimed Wood from Corn Crib HOW TO DESIGN AND BUILD AN ENTRY WAY COAT RACK AND BENCH There was a door in granddad’s home the client wanted to preserve and wondered, if they provided the wood, could I build an entryway coat rack and bench using the door as part of the build. The wood they wanted to provide, well, that was from the family owned Tennessee corn crib that had been torn down and they didn’t want to lose the wood or the memories. Not only was this a corncrib but it was eventually used by the great grandchildren as a play house. So for the client there are as many memories in this build as there are colors. THIS PROJECT TRULY DEFINES THE “CUSTOM” in BAYNE CUSTOM WOODWORKING. I spent some time to design a simple layout in @sketchup_official so the client could approve the idea I had in mind. The wood showed up in two deliveries so we stacked it outside because this was the first time I worked with barn wood. I did not want to introduce possible termites to my shop. So my first call was to my pest guy asking how I would treat the wood for termites. Much to my relief he said I had nothing to worry about. This was “real” wood! Not nominal at all, nominal is how we buy our wood at a local hardware store. Where a 2×4 is actually 1 ½  x 3 ½ . These 2×4’s were at least 2”x4”’s if not more and were hard, heavy and dusty, did I say heavy? After cutting to length on my handy @DewaltTough miter saw, I had to take them to my @ridgidpowertools table saw and square up the bottoms only.  I was very careful not to lose any of the original saw marks and character because that would ruin the entire purpose. For someone who likes clean, crisp edges, this was a bit of a challenge. I used @kregjig Kreg Jig® K4 Master System to join all the pieces of the base, the seat frame and the supports to join the two together. I was very careful to hide all of the pocket holes so they could not be seen from any angle. I used Titebond Products original interior wood glue to join all the pieces together. The next item was to assemble the back which included grandad’s door as the center piece. The door was only 71 ½ tall which determined the overall height of the project. Part of this back also includes two live edge pieces that we picked to use as the “L” shaped wings or side walls. The door measured 24” which left me with 6” on each side to make up the final size of 36”. So I chose two of the straightest boards that were closest to 6” and cut them to width so as not to waste any wood or lose any character. I used the Kreg Jig® K4 Master System

Diablo's 6-piece Starter Bit Set includes a variety Diablo's 6-piece Starter Bit Set includes a variety of profiles ideal for the beginning woodworker. Featuring TiCo carbide with titanium these bits provide a long cutting life and ultra-fine finish. Perma-Shield Diablo's high performance coating reduces friction and build-up on the bits. The bits kick-back reducing design allows for safer ...  More + Product Details Close
The end grain of wood soaks up finishes and often turns much darker than the face grain. Check for this on your test block. If you get an ugly result, pretreat the end grain with a dose of finish that will limit absorption (wood conditioner, sanding sealer, shellac or polyurethane thinned 50 percent). Apply the treatment with an artist’s brush and be careful not to slop onto the face grain.
Taking cabinet building to the next level I wanted to take another step in my building and see if I could build a cabinet without the use of screws. My wife found the plans in an old Woodsmith Magazine and asked me to build the largest bookcase of the set. My plan was to build the entire cabinet using dowels instead of screws, dado slots instead of pocket hole joinery and biscuit joints. Using rough oak purchased from a local lumber mill, I milled and sized the lumber to the specifications to create this book cabinet with 5 shelves. It was time to replace a number of older pine book cases in the house. Instead of using the traditional pocket hole joinery, the sides, shelves, doors and face frame were all joined using 3/8” dowels,biscuit joints, dados and glue. I used tempered glass for the doors for safety which I was able to purchase locally. The glass vendor recommended using silicone caulk to secure each pane before applying a few small mirror catches on all the sides. The doors were each hung with 3 Ball-Tip Full Back-to-Back Wrap-Around Inset Hinges. Finished with Minwax English Chestnut and homemade wiping polyurethane, this cabinet will stand the test of time and hopefully become a keepsake that is passed down through generations. *DISCLOSURE: Some of the links in this post are affiliate links. If you chose to click through and make a purchase I will earn a commission but there is no additional cost to you. It helps compensates the business for the time spent creating these posts. THANK YOU!
Be sure wood is dry. Material from a job site or floor joists that existed in a crawlspace may have high moisture content; material from a conditioned space should be dry. Wood can be dried in a kiln (ask your local lumber mill) or stored inside through the winter. If time does not permit, stack wood in a hot dry place with 1" spacers between layers. Allow to dry for a minimum of two weeks.
​Luckily, we have also managed to find a detailed video tutorial of the Barn door project that illustrates the process of building a Barn door of your own. The steps and instructions in the video tutorial are different from the source links listed above. Actually, you can make different types of designs for your Barn door depending on which one you can afford easily and DIY on your own.
Slice, dice and serve in style on this easy, attractive board. We’ll show you a simple way to dry-fit the parts, scribe the arc and then glue the whole thing together. We used a 4-ft. steel ruler to scribe the arcs, but a yardstick or any thin board would also work. Find complete how-to instructions on this woodworking crafts project here. Also, be sure to use water-resistant wood glue and keep your board out of the dishwasher or it might fall apart. And one more thing: Keep the boards as even as possible during glue-up to minimize sanding later. For great tips on gluing wood, check out this collection.
Aside from the privacy it offers, a latticework porch trellis is a perfect way to add major curb appeal to your home for $100 or less. The trellis shown here is made of cedar, but any decay-resistant wood like redwood, cypress or treated pine would also be a good option. Constructed with lap joints for a flat surface and an oval cutout for elegance, it’s a far upgrade from traditional premade garden lattice. As long as you have experience working a router, this project’s complexity lies mostly in the time it takes to cut and assemble. Get the instructions complete with detailed illustrations here.

This continuous absorption and releasing of moisture causes the wood to swell and shrink. This swelling and shrinking causes the wood to move and this movement causes issues. When it’s more humid, the moisture in the air is absorbed and the wood swells. The swelling actually has enough force to push and pull joints apart. Worse yet, if the wood is joined incorrectly it can cause the wood to crack and split.
Here’s an old woodworking adage I enjoy ignoring: “measure twice, cut once.” Honestly, I measure nonce and cut thrice. I often eyeball it. I use pieces I’ve already cut to measure what I need to cut. It’s not a great habit, but I prefer it to measuring everything. And the results usually aren’t that different. At least that’s what I tell myself. I ended up having to sand down the ends of the 2×12’s running the length of the table (where they meet the aprons) because they weren’t exactly the same length.
An assortment of chisels should be part of every workbench. Chisels are not just for wood carvers. Any woodworker will need chisels to clean out joints and saw cuts. Look for chisels made of high-alloy carbon steel or chromium-vanadium alloyed steel. Hardwood grips are best, especially if they have metal caps on them. This will keep the end of the handle from becoming malformed when you hammer on it.
This could quite possibly be the best tool on this list! Have you ever tried to get your drill in a tight spot where you absolutely had to use it and just couldn’t? Holy Moly has this happened to me like 100 times. Almost nothing is more frustrating! With this flex shaft, you can bend around corners and fit into impossibly tight spaces like a knife through hot butter! Buy this thing!!!!
If you want your table top -- any table top -- to actually ast without bowing/cupping/twisting, you MUST attach it in a manner that allows for seasonal wood movement. Wood is an organic product, and it naturally expands and contracts with changes in temperature and humidity. I'll post link below to a couple of options that you can cheaply buy which will allow you to securely attach a tabletop while still giving the wood the flexibility to move with the seasons. When you buy decently-made furniture at a store, they all accommodate for this one way or another. Don't just screw the top down to the legs or the skirt...you'll regret it later on.
Begin by cutting off a 10-in. length of the board and setting it aside. Rip the remaining 38-in. board to 6 in. wide and cut five evenly spaced saw kerfs 5/8 in. deep along one face. Crosscut the slotted board into four 9-in. pieces and glue them into a block, being careful not to slop glue into the saw kerfs (you can clean them out with a knife before the glue dries). Saw a 15-degree angle on one end and screw the plywood piece under the angled end of the block.
Do you enjoy splinters or cuts from metal flashing? Nope me neither. THESE GLOVES ARE THE SHIZ NIT! I have yet to get a splinter when handling my rough-edged plywood. Not only are they cheap but extra reliable. Mom these gloves are for you (My poor mom always gets splinters when she helps me DIY). This is one of the unique tools you’ll be happy you own.
Although it’s tempting to use a random orbit sander to smooth your table top at the final stages, I never do. Finish quality is the reason why. Random orbit sanders often leave behind swirl marks that don’t show up until finishing time. A better option is to complete the sanding process by hand, using 180-, then 220-grit paper only in the direction of wood grain. The finish of a tabletop is more closely examined than wood finishes anywhere else, so you need to eliminate all flaws.
Drill four 5/8-in.-dia. 1/2-in.-deep holes on the large disc?inside the traced circle?then use 5/8-in. dowel centers to transfer the hole locations to the underside of the small disc. Drill four 1/2-in.-deep holes on the underside of the small disc and a 1/2-in.-deep hole in the center of the top for the dowel handle. Glue in the dowels to join the discs, and glue in the handle. We drilled a wood ball for a handle knob, but a screw-on ceramic knob also provides a comfortable, attractive grip.
Once your table is completely dry, flip it over and push the edge of the table over your workspace edge. Go ahead and trim the excess maple so that it is flush with the MDF using a circular saw. Make sure these edges are straight and refined, as these will end up being the finished edges of your table top. Flip the table top over and sand smooth, wiping off any sawdust afterwards.
Hi Mitchell – Thank you for the heads up… I thought I mentioned that in that in the post, but you’re right, I didn’t. Yes, wood expands across its width, so in order to allow for expansion/contraction there should be a small gap where the edges of the boards meet the apron. You don’t need a gap where the ends of the board meet the apron because wood doesn’t really expand/contract in this direction.

Aside from the privacy it offers, a latticework porch trellis is a perfect way to add major curb appeal to your home for $100 or less. The trellis shown here is made of cedar, but any decay-resistant wood like redwood, cypress or treated pine would also be a good option. Constructed with lap joints for a flat surface and an oval cutout for elegance, it’s a far upgrade from traditional premade garden lattice. As long as you have experience working a router, this project’s complexity lies mostly in the time it takes to cut and assemble. Get the instructions complete with detailed illustrations here.
The Bosch Max FlexiClick 5-in-1 Drill/Driver System has one tool and five attachments. That means it can perform all kinds of tasks, like: screw-driving, drilling, right angle drilling/driving and offset driving close to edges. This tool/tools isn’t going to replace a deck builder’s 20v impact driver and drill, but it might be a great option for those smaller project that require a bunch of different operations, like knocking off a punch list at the end of a build-out. If you’re moving around and don’t have the space to haul around a bunch of dedicated tools this might be just what you’re looking for. The Bosch 5-in-1 Drill Driver System is available online and in home centers for $199.00.
When you buy the wood, look for pieces that aren’t warped, excessively longer or shorter than the others, and, if you can get lucky, don’t carry the telltale “new wood” planer marks. We purchased the most inexpensive wood that we could find. You’ll likely find them in 2- and 4-ft pieces. If you have a saw at home, you might consider getting the 4 ft pieces to decrease the cost of your project a bit.

Verdict : Ted’s product is EXTREMELY extensive with 16k plans and there are tons of projects to choose from. Not every woodworker online loves it, but it’s cheap and perfect for every level of experience, I love it because this is basically the only resource I need. I highly suggest it. They also offer a really solid money back guarantee if you don’t like it after all. 

Whether you're new to woodworking or you've been doing it for years, Woodcraft's selection of woodworking projects is one the best places to find your next big project. Whether you're looking to make wooden furniture, pens, toys, jewelry boxes, or any other project in between, the avid woodworker is sure to find his or her next masterpiece here. Find hundreds of detailed woodworking plans with highly accurate illustrations, instructions, and dimensions. Be sure to check out our Make Something blog to learn expert insights and inspiration for your next woodworking project.
Drill four 5/8-in.-dia. 1/2-in.-deep holes on the large disc?inside the traced circle?then use 5/8-in. dowel centers to transfer the hole locations to the underside of the small disc. Drill four 1/2-in.-deep holes on the underside of the small disc and a 1/2-in.-deep hole in the center of the top for the dowel handle. Glue in the dowels to join the discs, and glue in the handle. We drilled a wood ball for a handle knob, but a screw-on ceramic knob also provides a comfortable, attractive grip.
I’ve been doing a lot of remodeling on my house and this wristband has come in pretty handy. The magnets work very well and able to hold all the screws, washers, and bolts for the different projects I’m working on. The pockets are a great addition too for holding plastic items. In fact, I found it useful for holding a small pencil where I can have quick access to for marking measurements for cuts. Overall it’s a great quality wristband and would definitely recommend.

The next important hand tool for the woodworker is an accurate tape measure. Get a retractable one that is at least 25 feet long. Any longer than that, and you start having problems getting it to roll back up. Since measurements on large scale projects can be very susceptible to even the most minute measurement variations, you’ll want to make sure the “hook” or tab at the end of the is firmly attached, with no give. When they get loose, you’ll have as much as 1/8” variation in your measurements. This can add up to some severe accuracy problems in the long run.


We recently upgraded a wheelbarrow with Simply Dump It pivoting handles. They slid right over the handles and took about five minutes to install. If you’re tall, you probably hunch over when you roll your wheelbarrow around the yard so you don’t end up nose-diving the wheel guard/brace into the ground, resulting in messy spills and the occasional expletive. The Simply Dump It handles raise the grip location a few inches, which lowers the handles, which in turn raises the front wheel brace. The handles not only prevent sudden stopping syndrome but also make the wheelbarrow easier to control, especially on rough terrain. And the pivoting action all but eliminates the awkward torque on your wrists when you empty the wheelbarrow. You can get Simply Dump It handles online.
Clamp curved caul edges inwards so they align tabletop boards in the middle, then torque up the main clamps to draw the boards together. If the width of boards you’re using allow it, pre-glue boards for your tabletop in sections that are just narrow enough to fit within your thickness planer. Run these through the planer to clean and level the glue joints, then move back to clamps for final glue up. Working in stages like this reduces the number of glue joints you need to sand smooth and level later.

Now, the project starts to get really interesting. While I knew that I would use pocket-hole joinery (my latest obsession) to assemble the tabletop, I couldn’t decide how to finish the wood. There were three different cans of Minwax Gel Stain on my shelf, in three different colors—Hickory, Cherrywood, and Honey Maple. In my head, I could make a credible argument in favor of each one. And though it would have helped to know where the table would eventually go, that was another question I couldn’t answer. Then it hit me: Rather than choose one stain, why not use them all? After all, I was constructing the tabletop from scraps, so it was going to have a homemade, mosaic look no matter what. In the end, using multiple stains would emphasize the rustic effect the table was going to achieve. Perfect! From there, having fought my way to a project plan, the rest came easy. Read on to see how I built the tabletop, then stained and sealed it with Minwax.


The most commonly purchased claw hammer is the 20 oz. size. It’s heavy enough to easily drive nails but easily manipulated when pulling nails. While wooden handles are picturesque, they may not stand up to the strain if you have to pull a lot of nails. Hammers with a steel handle, or even fiberglass, will be stronger. However, these won’t absorb the vibrations from driving nails the way a hickory handle will. You’ll also need to make sure the fiberglass and metal handles have a rubberized grip for control and comfort. If you’re going to be driving a lot of nails, the wooden handled hammer will be better for reducing stress on your hand, and wrist, too.
Manufacturers that produce woodworking tools and materials have got into the content creation game, too, and some will share woodworking plans online. Minwax and Ryobi, for example, provides their plans free of charge, and Rockler offers their woodworking plans for a fee. Seek them out along with the other blogs and you’ll have a handy list of resources you can turn to for any project. 

Diablo's 3 piece Adjustable Cabinet Router Bit Set Diablo's 3 piece Adjustable Cabinet Router Bit Set features a rail and stile bit set and a Double Shear raised panel bit. Featuring TiCo carbide with titanium these bits provide a long cutting life and ultra-fine finish. Perma-Shield Diablo's high performance coating reduces friction and build-up on the bits. The ...  More + Product Details Close

The Stanley 32050 FatMax Power Claw is a clever power strip built into a clamp. It can grab on to a stud, rafter, sawhorse or ladder. Hang it wherever you need power. This strip works great at keeping extension cord connections off the ground. That’s convenient, but it makes even more sense if you’re working outside on a wet surface. The Power Claw has three grounded outlets and a 15-amp breaker.


Every student requires help with homework from time to time. Somebody works part-time and doesn’t have enough time to do all the assignments. Others are not good writing essays and always experience difficulties when they have to complete one more paper. Sometimes, even the best students become too exhausted and don’t have enough energy to write a quality paper. In such moments everybody needs a little help, and Homeworkfor.me is always ready to lend a hand with any academic problem.
Drilling into tile is sort of a three hand operation: hold the drill, spray the water, and make sure the water stays were it’s supposed to. The Aqua Shot from Miyanaga is a great solution to your ceramic drilling woes. The Aqua Shot drill bit has a built-in water tank that feeds water to the drill as you operate, making the whole process much smoother. Just load the chamber up with water, flip a switch and drill away. The Aqua Shot works with impact drivers and the individual tips can be replaced when they get worn out without having to replace the whole tool. The Aqua Shot is available online for $82.80. Click here for a video of the Aqua Shot in action.
Begin by cutting off a 10-in. length of the board and setting it aside. Rip the remaining 38-in. board to 6 in. wide and cut five evenly spaced saw kerfs 5/8 in. deep along one face. Crosscut the slotted board into four 9-in. pieces and glue them into a block, being careful not to slop glue into the saw kerfs (you can clean them out with a knife before the glue dries). Saw a 15-degree angle on one end and screw the plywood piece under the angled end of the block.
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