Slice, dice and serve in style on this easy, attractive board. We’ll show you a simple way to dry-fit the parts, scribe the arc and then glue the whole thing together. We used a 4-ft. steel ruler to scribe the arcs, but a yardstick or any thin board would also work. Find complete how-to instructions on this woodworking crafts project here. Also, be sure to use water-resistant wood glue and keep your board out of the dishwasher or it might fall apart. And one more thing: Keep the boards as even as possible during glue-up to minimize sanding later. For great tips on gluing wood, check out this collection.
When you buy the wood, look for pieces that aren’t warped, excessively longer or shorter than the others, and, if you can get lucky, don’t carry the telltale “new wood” planer marks. We purchased the most inexpensive wood that we could find. You’ll likely find them in 2- and 4-ft pieces. If you have a saw at home, you might consider getting the 4 ft pieces to decrease the cost of your project a bit.
Crisp, tight joints are key to any great tabletop, and this is where the jointer comes in. Get help supporting boards longer than about five feet as you work. Also, if some joints don’t come together tightly, despite your best jointing efforts, try moving the boards to new locations if grain patterns permit. Some edges just naturally fit together more tightly than others. Don’t own a jointer? Pieces of planed lumber sometimes fit together just fine without jointing. Try different boards as neighbours to see which ones get along the best.
Attach all four legs and set the top on the base with equal overhang on all sides. Carefully trace the leg tops on the bottom side of the planks and then flip it over onto a work surface. Drill a 1/2” hole with each square mark near the line but not touching it. Using a jigsaw, carefully cut out each square. Because leg tops will nest snuggly in these squares, be sure cuts are slightly undersized. Flip the top back over and attempt to set it on the base. Using a flat wood file and chisel, remove small amounts of material as needed. Once the top nestles down on the gutter structure without excess force, run a small bead of wood glue on the top edges of the gutter, reposition the top and shoot 15-gauge finish nails through the inside edge of the gutter into the bottom of the tabletop. Fill in small gaps between the leg top and table planks with wood filler or small wood shims.
 THANKS ERIC! A few weeks ago we met Eric and Vicki Rhoten at the Work Bench Conference in Atlanta. We hit it off immediately, as we both have a passion for woodworking. As we were discussing our businesses, Eric mentioned how difficult it is for him to get certain woods in Arizona. We are blessed here in Tennessee to have many mills including a local cedar mill. I offered to send Eric some samples to try and that’s what this video is about. Eric does an awesome job demonstrating how he turned one of the pieces into a beautiful piece. We loved seeing the wood we sent turned into this awesome piece of art. Great job Eric! Need some wood? If you’re interested in getting your own pieces of cedar, we’ve put together some basic options and pricing. Since wood can be pretty heavy the mailing costs can be high, so we’ve found the sweet spot is three pieces of wood in a flat rate USPS box, to get the most wood for the price of mailing it! We’ll have a shopping area up very soon, but meanwhile use this form to contact me.  

After all slots are cut, stand each board on end and coat the edge of jointed side with wood glue. Next coat the biscuits with glue. Insert biscuits in one side only of each board, then insert glued biscuits in the empty joint of the next board. Assemble planks in order until the top is complete. Don't worry about small gaps. Next, carefully lay the top down and attach pipe clamps at roughly 1' intervals. Slowly tighten each pipe clamp in a consistent fashion until the gaps disappear*. Small amounts of glue can be removed when dry; scrape up any puddled glue with a plastic putty knife. To minimize sanding later, avoid working glue into the top of the wood. Let the top set overnight.
She has permanently glued and screwed the tabletop within that four-sided, mitered frame. Attaching the skirt to the long edges of the wide boards is no problem, but fastening them to the end grain of the wide boards, as shown in the photo above, is. The builder has constricted the wide boards' movement, and as they grow or shrink in width but are held in place by those end-caps, they will warp and split, making this a short-lived piece of furniture.
From the source tutorial, you can get illustrates to the instruction about the plan. Everything is fairly described as diagrams, images, the list of supplies and tools need etc. The process to this plan is very easy to understand and follow for if you are having some basic woodworking knowledge. Make sure to collect all the supplies you need before you start with the project. You may even ask any question directly in the comment section of the tutorial post and also comment the images of your final product if you have completed it. Either way, I hope that you will manage to build this one nicely.​
With a pencil and a protractor, divide the larger disc into 30-degree wedges to create 12 center lines for the bottle indents. Center and trace the smaller disc on top of the larger disc. Next, with a drill press, drill 3/8-in.-deep holes on the 12 center lines with the 1-7/8-in. Forstner bit, spacing them between the disc’s outer edge and the traced circle. Next, divide the smaller disc into 60-degree wedges and drill six more 3/8-in.-deep holes with the Forstner bit.

This is a very colorful and fun project. The idea is to use an old table with a top that you don’t really like and to give it a makeover. You don’t need paint for this project, just a lot of colored tape. Use it to make stripes to cover the entire surface of the tabletop. You can also wrap the edges in tape. You can also cover it with lacquer or add plexiglass on top to protect the design.
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Slice, dice and serve in style on this easy, attractive board. We’ll show you a simple way to dry-fit the parts, scribe the arc and then glue the whole thing together. We used a 4-ft. steel ruler to scribe the arcs, but a yardstick or any thin board would also work. Find complete how-to instructions on this woodworking crafts project here. Also, be sure to use water-resistant wood glue and keep your board out of the dishwasher or it might fall apart. And one more thing: Keep the boards as even as possible during glue-up to minimize sanding later. For great tips on gluing wood, check out this collection.
Clean wooden gutters of any loose debris and cut to a manageable length. Miter down to form an approximately 40" x 94" rectangle. Coat the corners with wood glue and fasten together with 15-gauge finish nails. If miters are tight 45-degree cuts, box should be square. Double check diagonal measurements before fastening completely. The two diagonal measurements should be as close to equal as possible.
And if you haven’t got a fancy stencil hanging around, you can still give your table a stencil-styled makeover, and it won’t take much.  To make this fun herringbone table, Shark Tails took a boring side table and taped off a herringbone design then spray painted it gold!  It adds a touch of mod glam that’s not overwhelming since it’s in a small dose. // Shark Tails
If you’re like me, every time you wander through a big-box furniture store, you feel a little insulted. Here you are, a man, staring at relatively simple furniture, being asked to lay down large sums of money for a bookshelf, dining set, or desk. And if you know enough about wood to spot laminate and fiberboard, you’ll quickly see these expensive pieces of furniture have a shelf life (no pun intended) of about two years.
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Using an orbital or belt sander, carefully sand down the tops of the legs (1/16" high) until even with the top. Sand any rough spots or glue marks. The table, gutter and legs can now be painted, stained, polyurethaned or waxed. Walnut-tinted furniture wax was used to finish the table shown. Apply several coats of wax over the course of several days to fully saturate the wood grain.
This set of tools have helped a lot in my startup of woodworking. I'm an amateur, and these bars really helped me out. These have come to be very useful in my recent project, where I'm trying to build a kitchen open faced cabinet, and I needed to cut some dado's and these have helped quite a bit. I also used them to help set up my table saw to the correct height of he blade, to accurately cut slots by measuring the height of the blade for the slot cuts in my drawers. I've tried using rulers, but one needs 4 hands to make all the correct measurements. These cut out the other 2 set of hands.

But when you get a much larger tabletop (especially ones with small aprons or no plywood underneath)- you've got more opportunity for movement. A small cupping across each board can become substantial across an entire tabletop. Consider attaching your tabletop with tabletop fastners. You just make a small cut in the aprons with a circular saw, insert the tabletop fastner (also called Z-Clip) in the cut, and attach other end to the underside of the tabletop.
There are lots of clear finishes. But for a combination of usability and durability, you can’t beat polyurethane. Oil-based poly, which dries slower than water-based, is best for beginners because it allows more working time. The other important difference is clarity: Water-based poly is absolutely colorless, while oil-based has an amber tone, which can be good or bad depending on the look you want.
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